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‘Peloton husband’ sticks it to haters when he posts perfect Christmas gift for ‘actual girlfriend’

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If you’re easily offended, then beware, because you’re in for a world of hurt, baby.

Remember the otherwise benign Peloton ad that sparked fire and fury from the Perpetually Offended™ who accused it of being sexist and misogynist?

Here’s a reminder of that ad:

https://youtu.be/pShKu2icEYw

“How dare an exercise company feature an ad of a man gifting his wife an exercise bike for Christmas!” the triggered shrieked in rage. “Down with the patriarchy!”

And yes, people really issued those sorts of complaints …

In response, Peloton doubled down, saying in a statement, “While we’re disappointed in how some have misinterpreted this commercial, we are encouraged by — and grateful for — the outpouring of support we’ve received from those who understand what we were trying to communicate.”

And now, nearly a month later, the actor who played the husband in the original ad has doubled down as well — and he’s done so in a manner so brash and unrepentant that it’s bound to trigger raging outbursts for weeks to come.

Behold:

 

View this post on Instagram

 

Here’s hoping this goes over better the second time…. Merry Christmas to my actual girlfriend (pls don’t leave me)??

A post shared by Sean Hunter (@pelotonhusband) on

As seen in the Instagram photo above, in response to the contrived outrage over Peloton’s allegedly “sexist” message, actor Sean Hunter decided to gift his real girlfriend with the exact same exercise bike featured in the original ad.

If anyone was triggered by this photo, they likely earned it. After the original ad went viral earlier this month, the Perpetually Offended™ reportedly hammered him, an actor, with derogatory messages because of his participation in the ad.

“I couldn’t believe what I was seeing. My 5 seconds of air time created an array of malicious feedback that is all associated with my face,” he reportedly wrote in a blog post at the time.

“Unfortunately, the problem is that viewers can mistake an actor as that person after they’ve seen them on television instead of a person given a script with no opinion on what they are being told to portray.”

Meanwhile, the radically far-left columnists at The Guardian accused Hunter of trying to portray himself as a victim.

“Hunter could have spent five minutes thinking critically about why the ad was being called ‘sexist,'” columnist Arwa Mahdawi dismissively opined.

“Instead he whined that ‘viewers can mistake an actor as that person after they’ve seen them on television instead of a person given a script with no opinion on what they are being told to portray.'”

Mahdawi made headlines earlier this year when she penned a column blaming men for the #MeToo movement’s negative aftereffects.

Dovetailing back to the present, as of roughly noon Thursday the story of his gift was still too fresh for any outrage to surface. However, the outrage from earlier in the month still permeated social media.

And to be clear, the outrage was 100 percent real.

“Creepy. Sexist. Dystopian. Those aren’t the rave reviews you want if you’re trying to sell exercise bikes,” the left-wing Canadian Broadcast Corporation reported in early December. “But that’s the response the company Peloton is getting after putting out its newest ad campaign for its exercise bikes tha[t] allow users to take internet-connected spin classes.”

When Peloton doubled down, the anger only grew, with one columnist from Inc. magazine accusing the brand of being out-of-touch and disconnected from the public …

Yet for every raging critic, there was a larger army of supporters who thought and still think that the ad was much ado about nothing.

Look (*Language warning):

Vivek Saxena

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