‘Slow Joe’ Biden gets confused again: ‘The president and I …’

(CBS News video screenshot file photo)

The same day that President Donald Trump accused former Vice President Joe Biden of getting “slower and slower,” the former VP-turned very confused 2020 contender unintentionally proved the president’s words true to a T.

How? By accidentally getting the time, date and, well, reality itself completely mixed up while rambling about the sort of “green” initiatives he’d pursue as president.

“There has to be some hard rules laid down in this decade so that by 2030 we’re well along the way in terms of transportation, in terms of energy, in terms of wind, in terms of solar, in terms of a whole range of alternatives that allow us just, for example, the standards we set for buildings and that we should be providing,” he said to reporters Friday.

So far, so good, though to be clear, the sort of “hard rules” he alluded to would devastate the U.S. economy and hurt the environment as well.

“And it’d also help people with housing, if you were able to continue to have what we propose, and I propose, what the president and I … have tax credits for insulating homes, tax credits for making all businesses, all buildings, you know – energy contained, etc. so there’s a lot of things that we can do,” he added.

Listen:


(Source: Telegraph Herald)

Did you catch it? He referred to “the president and I.” And given the current president’s stance on the left’s radical climate change policies, it’s clear Biden didn’t mean him.

No, Biden meant former President Barack Hussein Obama, whom he served loyally by as vice president from 2009 to very early 2017.

Viewed independently, this may seem like a minor, irrelevant, one-time gaffe. But contrasted alongside the former VP’s litany of other misstatements, it becomes clear that the 76-year-old’s mental acuity isn’t at the level that it used to be.

On Thursday, just a day before this latest gaffe, he confused the Paris Climate Accord with the Paris Peace Accords, a peace treaty signed in 1973 to end the Vietnam War.

“I’m going to make sure that we rejoin the Paris Peace Accord on day one, and I’m going to announce within the first 100 days those 173 nations that are going to come and meet in Washington, D.C., to up the ante,” he said at an event.

Listen:

While speaking on Wednesday, just two days before the latest gaffe, about unions, he argued that when unions do better, everyone else does as well, which in turn leads to more domestic spending and an upsurge in the economy.

“So they buy more of the farm products. They buy more — they go the drugstore more. They go into the — into the — into the haberdasher more,” he said.

This wasn’t so much of a gaffe as it was a sign of his age. “Haberdasher” is an obsolete word for someone who sells men’s clothing.

Listen:

And during last month’s Democrat primary debate, Biden confused the word “stock market” with the work “supermarket.”

“Why should someone who’s clipping coupons in the stock market pay, in fact, pay a lower tax rate than someone who in fact is, like I said, a schoolteacher and a fireman?” He said. “It’s ridiculous.”

Watch:

All these point to a man who’s, well, slow and old. It’s in fact a point that the president — as in the current president — noted later Friday evening during a rally in Mississippi.

“We’ve now named him, very slow ‘Sleepy Joe,'” the president said. “He’s gotten slower and slower. I’m afraid if he gets the nomination he’ll be so slow we’ll have the lowest-rated debates in history. I don’t think Sleepy Joe will get it.”

All this comes amid the release of a new New York Times/Siena College poll published Friday that found Biden in fifth place in the key battleground state of Iowa.

“The survey is full of alarming signs for Mr. Biden, who entered the race in April at the top of the polls in Iowa and nationally,” the Times reported. “He is still in the lead in most national polls, but his comparatively weak position in the earliest primary and caucus states now presents a serious threat to his candidacy.”

“With the Iowa caucuses just three months away, Mr. Biden’s unsteadiness appears to have opened a path in the race for other Democrats closer to the political middle.”

Vivek Saxena

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

V. Saxena is a staff writer for BizPac Review with a decade of experience as a professional writer, and a lifetime of experience as an avid news junkie. He holds a degree in computer technology from Purdue University.
Vivek Saxena

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