Dems don’t have the goods, says Brokaw. Impeachment votes start falling off.

(NBC News video screenshot file photo/Video screenshot)

One “yuge” wrench was thrown into congressional Democrats’ impeachment plans Tuesday courtesy two small but vitally important events.

First, decidedly left-wing “journalist” Tom Brokaw declared that, unlike with the impeachment inquiry against disgraced former President Richard Nixon, this time Democrats lack “the goods” needed to take out current President Donald Trump.

“The big difference [between then and now] is … they still don’t have what you would call the goods on this president in terms of breaking the law and being an impeachable target for them,” he said Tuesday afternoon to MSNBC host Andrew Mitchell.

“They’re going to start the process,” he continued, referring to plans by Democrats to hold a formal impeachment vote Thursday, “but they don’t have the same kind of clarity that the people who were opposed to Richard Nixon had because it was so clear that these were criminal acts that he was involved in.”

In short, they have no REAL bombshells and smoking guns. It’s all smoke and mirrors — including even the formal impeachment vote.

Listen:


(Source: MSNBC)

Second, a slew of swing district Democrats began expressing doubts about the Thursday vote, including New Jersey Rep. Jeff Van Drew:

“The odds are, if you really look at it objectively: he’ll be impeached here, they’ll then go to the Senate, he’ll be vindicated. So, he will still be the president and he will be able to go around and say, ‘I have been vindicated because I was not impeached,'” he said to Newsweek.

“I don’t know that we gain that much from that. I know what we lose: I know that we split people further apart; I know that we split the country apart even more; I know that we, regardless of what people say, get less work done.”

Rep. Collin Peterson, whose district in Minnesota reportedly voted for Trump over then-Democrat nominee Hillary Clinton by 30 points, is expected to vote similarly.

“[B]ased on a statement he issued in September about the impeachment inquiry, which his office highlighted, it’s likely Peterson will not support the measure,” Newsweek notes. “He previously said an inquiry would likely become a ‘failed process’ that further divides the country, and that anyone who thought it would “constrain” Trump was ‘fooling themselves.'”

And then there’s Rep. Anthony Brindisi, another swing-district Democrat. Speaking with Politico, he complained that the Democrats were moving too quickly.

“It looks like things are moving quicker than a lot of people had anticipated. For me, I’m in no rush here,” he said, adding that he wasn’t certain how he’d vote Thursday.

All this bodes well for congressional Republicans. While they have complained about the Democrats holding an informal impeachment inquiry — namely because Democrats have been exploiting the lack of formality to play unfair — the formal resolution put forth by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi would reportedly leave both Republicans and the president in the same bind:

The resolution would even reportedly grant House Intelligence Committee chair Adam Schiff the power to continue releasing selective transcripts that benefit Democrats:

Some have argued that all this resolution “does is legitimize his selective leaking. Now he can release excerpts as he sees fit without having to shovel them through CNN. If a testimony helps Donald Trump, he can simply hold it back and no doubt he will.”

Even top Democrat leaders have essentially admitted that the resolution is a sham.

“This is not an impeachment resolution,” House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said to reporters Tuesday morning.

In her own statement to reporters a day earlier, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi admitted the resolution was “not an impeachment resolution.”

Then what is it …!?

Vivek Saxena

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

V. Saxena is a staff writer for BizPac Review with a decade of experience as a professional writer, and a lifetime of experience as an avid news junkie. He holds a degree in computer technology from Purdue University.
Vivek Saxena

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