State Dept refuting parts of whistleblower’s report after fact-checking

(FILE PHOTO by video screenshot)

The complaint against President Donald Trump filed by a partisan whistleblower reportedly within the CIA has already begun to fall apart thanks to a litany of factual inaccuracies.

On the third page of the complaint, the still-unnamed partisan whistleblower claims via his own dubious sources that State Department counselor Ulrich Brechbuhl listened in on the conversation the president had over the summer with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

“Senior Govt Official tells @CBSNews Counselor to the State Department Ulrich Brechbuhl was NOT on the @POTUS call with #Zelensky, as the whistleblower complaint states,” CBS News State Department reporter Christina Ruffini confirmed Thursday through Twitter.

Other parts of the complaint seem to share this same detachment from the facts. Two possible reasons exist for this discrepancy. Either the whistleblower purposefully chose to lie and distort the facts, or the whistleblower was fed fake facts by his sources.

“I was not a direct witness to most of the events described,” the whistleblower admits in the first page of his complaint before proffering a defense of his sources.

“However, I found my colleagues’ accounts of these events to be credible because, in almost all cases, multiple officials recounted fact patterns that were consistent with one another. In addition, a variety of information consistent with these private accounts has been reported publicly.”

Given the clear-cut factual inaccuracies of his “colleagues’ accounts,” it seems that his decision to trust the “variety of information” he received was a faulty one, as Ruffini’s discovery in regard to Brechbuhl is just one of many inaccuracies contained in the full complaint.

In an extensive analysis of the complaint, which was released publicly Thursday and may be read in full further below, Sean Davis of The Federalist highlighted several of the inaccuracies.

The complaint accuses the president of requesting that Zelensky “locate and turn over servers used by the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and examined by the U.S. cybersecurity firm Crowdstrike.”

But that never happened.

“A review of the transcript of the call shows that while Trump mentioned Crowdstrike once during the call, he never made such a request about locating and turning over multiple servers to the U.S.,” Davis notes.

The complaint accuses the president of urging Zelensky to hold onto then-Ukrainian Prosecutor-General Yuriy Lutsenko, who was later ousted from his post on Aug. 19.

But that never happened.

“Trump made no such suggestion to Zelensky, according to the transcript of the phone call,” Davis notes. “While Trump did say that it was ‘unfair’ that a prosecutor who was ‘very good’ was ‘shut down,’ it’s not clear that Trump was even referring to Lutsenko, as a previous prosecutor named Viktor Shokin was fired after he opened investigations into a Ukrainian energy company that placed Hunter Biden, Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden’s son, on its board.”

As noted by Davis, the partisan whistleblower’s entire complaint is riddled with further “third-hand gossip and outright falsehoods.”

Read the complaint for yourself below:

Now compare it to the transcript of Trump’s call below:

According to Fred Fleitz, the current president of the Center for Security Policy and former chief of staff of the National Security Council, the complaint also seems unnaturally political in nature.

“It appears to be written by a law professor and includes legal references and detailed footnotes. It also has an unusual legalistic reference on how this complaint should be classified,” he pointed out in an op-ed for the New York Post published late Thursday afternoon.

“From my experience, such an extremely polished whistleblowing complaint is unheard of. This document looks as if this leaker had outside help, possibly from congressional members or staff,” he wrote.

Fleitz, a CIA veteran and Defense Intelligence Agency veteran, also expressed concerns about the behavior of the partisan whistleblower’s alleged sources.

“The content and transcripts of these calls are highly restricted,” he wrote. “The whistleblower makes clear in his complaint that he did not listen to a call in question, nor did he read the transcript — he was told about the call by others. If true, intelligence officers have grossly violated the rules as well as the trust placed on them to protect this sensitive information.”

“I refuse to believe that the leaking, timing and presentation of this complaint is coincidence. I don’t think the American people will buy this either,” he added.

Speaking with Fox Business Network host Lou Dobbs later that evening, House Freedom Caucus chair Mark Meadows predicted that these problems are just the tip of the iceberg.

“The foundation of this whistleblower complaint is already starting to fall apart,” he said. “There are reports out just a few minutes ago that are on page three, where the whistleblower said he heard that a counselor for the State Department was on the call.”

“Well, the State Department is saying no, that didn’t happen,” he added, eliciting laughter from Dobbs, who’s made it clear he believes this whole “scandal” is bunk. “Well, we’re gonna find a whole lot more that didn’t happen, and I can tell you what didn’t happen is that the president didn’t do anything wrong.

Listen to the whole discussion below:


(Source: Fox Business Network)

Vivek Saxena

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

V. Saxena is a staff writer for BizPac Review with a decade of experience as a professional writer, and a lifetime of experience as an avid news junkie. He holds a degree in computer technology from Purdue University.
Vivek Saxena

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