Trump’s Fed Reserve Board pick pulls back nomination after handful of Republicans join Romney in ‘concern’

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Criticism from the Senate’s seemingly less conservative Republican legislators appears to have played a role in killing the nomination of would-be Federal Reserve Board member Stephen Moore.

Only days after a handful of Senate Republicans, including Sen. Mitt Romney, expressed concerns about Moore’s credentials and alleged partisanship, the renowned economist withdrew his nomination.

The announcement was made Thursday afternoon on Twitter by President Donald Trump, who’d appointed the Club for Growth co-founder and former Wall Street Journal editorial board member to serve on the Fed back in mid-March.

The announcement was made three days after Sens. Joni Ernst, Shelley Moore Capito, Lisa Murkowski and Mitt Romney — expressed certain reservations about Moore’s nomination.

“I’m not enthused about what he has said in various articles,” Ernst, who’s up for reelection next year, told Seung Min Kim of The Washington Post.  “I think it’s ridiculous.”

“Some of his public statements probably need to be further vetted, like ‘you can’t have women referees.’ C’mon,” Capito likewise added in a statement to Alex Bolton of The Hill.

Following Moore’s nomination, radical far-left activists dug up his previous interviews and writings in search of anything potentially offensive. They wound up discovering allegedly sexist remarks.

He used to reportedly describe Fox News as “fair, balanced and blonde,” and he once wrote a column expressing his personal opinion that women should be banned from the March Madness tournament unless they’re exceptionally attractive.

“Here’s the rule change I propose: No more women refs, no women announcers, no women beer venders, no women anything. There is, of course, an exception to this rule. Women are permitted to participate, if and only if, they look like Bonnie Bernstein. The fact that Bonnie knows nothing about basketball is entirely irrelevant,” he wrote in one piece.

These were clearly shock-jock-type jokes. While a bit sleazy, it’s unclear why these jokes concern Ernst and her peers, not to mention the liberal activists who brought the jokes to their attention.

“I’m still doing my research on him,” Murkowski, who earned intense criticism last year after she refused to support Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation, said to The Hill.

Asked if she has any reservations, she replied, “Just the reservations that you guys have put out there. I’ll have to figure out how much is there. So, he’s written a lot and said a lot, so there’s a lot there.”

It’s unclear why she’s allowing left-wing activists and their media allies to influence her.

The last to opine on Moore’s nomination was Romney.

HERE’S WHAT YOU’RE MISSING …

“I hope that people who go on the Fed are economists and not partisan, and I’m reviewing his record, his columns and so forth,” he said to The Hill.

While it’s unclear what he’d meant by the “not partisan” remark — was he suggesting that Moore is partisan? — what’s known is that he reportedly led the charge to stop former pizza executive Herman Cain from being confirmed to also serve on the Federal Reserve Board.

“I don’t think Herman Cain would be confirmed by the Senate, and I think the president would be wise to nominate someone who is less partisan and more experienced in the world of economics,” Romney said to Bloomberg at the time. “I would anticipate voting no if he were nominated.”

Sens. Kevin Cramer, Cory Gardner and Lisa Murkowski pledged the same.

Cain eventually withdrew his nomination because of the endless opposition.

The fact that Romney (and Murkowski, in fact) was involved with both Cain and Moore’s withdrawals isn’t setting well with the president’s fervent supporters.

Look:

HERE’S WHAT YOU’RE MISSING …

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Vivek Saxena

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