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Hillary musters her Southern accent at Selma march, declares US is in ‘full-fledged crisis’

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Democrats still haven’t come to grasp the fact that just because they say something and their media allies regurgitate it doesn’t make it so.

Hillary Clinton said in a speech Sunday in Selma, Ala., that the country is facing “a full-fledged crisis” under President Donald Trump, the man who defeated her in 2016.

The two-time failed presidential candidate was at an event commemorating the 54th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday,” when civil rights protesters marching from Selma to Montgomery were violently attacked by law enforcement as they tried to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge.

(That several Democratic presidential hopefuls were on hand Sunday may suggest that Clinton hasn’t entirely ruled out another run.)

Claiming “racist and white supremacist views are lifted up” in the White House under President Trump, Clinton likened the alleged crisis to the turbulent 60s civil rights movement.

“This is a time, my friends, when fundamental rights, civic virtue, freedom of the press, the rule of law, truth, facts and reason are under assault,” she said.

“And make no mistake, we are living through a full-fledged crisis in our democracy,” Clinton added.

Never mind that we have a representative republic, not a “democracy,” which is code for direct democracy, the majority imposing its will on the minority — see mob rule.

 

But what would a gathering of Democrats be without the exploitation of race, as seen when Clinton warned that civil and voting rights were under attack in the U.S., going so far as to compare it those who risked real danger in the march to Montgomery all those years ago.

“To anyone who has ever wondered what you would have done during those defining moments that we read about in history books, whether you would have risked arrest to demand votes for women or bled on the Edmund Pettus bridge to demand voting rights for all, the answer is what you are doing now could be as important as anything that anyone has done before,” Clinton said.

Along with smearing Trump — she did not mention the president by name — Clinton pushed the divisive claim that “civil rights are being stripped back.”

“When racist and white supremacist views are lifted up in the media and the White House, when hard-fought-for civil rights are being stripped back, when the single most important fight of our time, which makes it possible to fight every other fight and must be, as Frederick Douglass would say, our North Star — the fight to protect our vote — is not gathering the momentum and the energy and the passion it deserves, we have a lot of work to do, don’t we?” she said.

Clinton would revisit that theme later, undermining the integrity of our elections and shaking the confidence in the electoral process as she angrily declared that the election in neighboring Georgia was stolen from Stacey Abrams, the Democratic gubernatorial candidate.

“Stacey Abrams should be governor, leading that state right now,” Clinton said.

 

But then, Americans are familiar with Hillary Clinton’s pandering by this point.

How do we know she’s pandering?

Well, for starters, because she suddenly rediscovered her southern accent speaking in the Deep South.

“Reverend Green, when those bones get up, and when that spirit is breathed into them, and they start climbing out of that valley, the first place they go is to register to vote!” she said at one point, speaking in an elusive southern drawl that seems to only surfaces south of the Mason-Dixon line.

Tom Tillison

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