Questions arise over freshman Muslim rep Ilhan Omar asking judge for leniency on ISIS recruits

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 24: U.S. Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) (L) and Rep. Ayanna Pressley (D-MA) (R) speak to members of the media after a news conference January 24, 2019 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The Democratic Congresswomen held a news conference on legislation providing childcare for workers affected by the ongoing government shutdown. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

One of the first Muslim congresswomen to ever serve in office once asked a judge to show “compassion” to defendants accused of having tried to join the Islamic State terrorist network.

The best deterrent to fanaticism is a system of compassion,” Rep. Ilhan Omar, then a newly elected Minnesota state representative, wrote in a letter to Judge Michael Davis two days after the 2016 general election. “We must alter our attitude and approach; if we truly want to affect change, we should refocus our efforts on inclusion and rehabilitation.”

She penned the letter in regard to defendant Abdirahman Yasin Daud and eight of his peers, all Minnesota men who were set at the time to be sentenced for trying to join ISIS.

According to Minneapolis station KMSP, Daud, in particular, participated in a plot to purchase passports and use them to travel to Syria to enlist with the terror network.

In her letter the Muslim congresswoman appeared to excuse the defendants’ actions, writing that they “chose violence to combat direct marginalization”  and claiming that “[t]he desire to commit violence is not inherent to people — it is the consequences of systematic alienation.”

“[P]eople seek violent solutions when the process established for enacting change is inaccessible to them,” she continued, echoing the sentiment among far-leftists that the root of Islamic terrorism isn’t Islam but rather so-called “marginalization” and even a lack of good jobs.

It’s unclear what “marginalization” the defendants faced as Islamic men in a state that caters to the Muslim community via the prohibition of anti-Muslim license plates, the promotion of Islam in schools and the allowance of Muslim schools and mosques practically everywhere.

It’s also unknown whether Omar actually performed her homework and read up on the case.

Fox News notes that Daud admitted in court that his attempt to travel to Syria had nothing to do with trying to get a job or escaping alleged “marginalization”: “I was going strictly to fight and kill on behalf of the Islamic State,” he said.

Despite Omar’s interference, he and his cohorts wound up receiving the full sentences initially planned for them, in part because nobody believed that they had the potential to be reformed.

“Everything you have said here, I don’t believe,” Judge Davis said after one of the defendants sobbed that he had merely lost his way while in search of justice.

“Only when backed into a corner, does he attempt to offer false contrition. You can’t fix manipulative. You can’t fix deceitful,” prosecutor Andrew Winter added.

Omar clearly saw things differently, which ought to come as no shocker given her propensity for aligning with all the wrong people, including but not limited to notorious antisemites, oppressive dictators and literal hate groups.

And as the KMSP report demonstrates, she’s aligned herself with would-be terrorists too:

The latter tweeter was correct.

“The bill won support from all but four of the 128 House members who voted, including Rep. Ilhan Omar, the country’s first Somali-American legislator,” the Star Tribune reported two years ago after a bill to ban FGM passed the Minnesota House, no thanks to Omar.

And slightly earlier that year she did indeed vote against a bill that would have limited life insurance payments to the beneficiaries of suspected terrorists.

These revelations add to growing concerns that Omar is far more loyal to her Islamic faith than she is to the United States of America.

Vivek Saxena

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

V. Saxena is a staff writer for BizPac Review with a decade of experience as a professional writer, and a lifetime of experience as an avid news junkie. He holds a degree in computer technology from Purdue University.
Vivek Saxena

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