Stacey Abrams refuses to call Brian Kemp legitimate governor of Georgia after election is certified

Even though former Georgia Secretary of State has been declared the winner in the state’s heated gubernatorial race, his opponent refuses to acknowledge his victory and concede.”

“The law, as it stands, says that he received an adequate number of votes to become the governor of Georgia,” failed Democrat nominee Stacey Abrams said Sunday morning on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

“And I acknowledge the law as it stands. I am a lawyer by training and I have taken the constitutional oath to uphold the law. But we know sometimes the law does not do what it should and something being legal does not make it right,” she added, using legal semantics to avoid actually conceding.

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Kemp defeated Abrams with more than just “an adequate number of votes.” According to Georgia’s top daily newspaper, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, he defeated her by a considerable margin.

“The election was certified Saturday after all 159 counties had reported their election results,” the outlet reported following the certification. “The final tally showed Kemp won the contest by roughly 55,000 votes but was within about 17,000 votes of being forced into a runoff.”

Abrams seems to believe these numbers are off. Why? Because she subscribes to the theory that Kemp somehow “stole” the election by compromising the state’s election system.

“It began eight years ago with the systematic disenfranchisement of more than a million voters,” she said. “It continued with the underfunding and disinvestment in polling places, in training and in the management of the county delivery of services. And I think it had its pinnacle in this race.”

“So yes, there was a deliberate and intentional disinvestment and, I think, destruction of the administration of elections in the state of Georgia.”

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She believes that as Georgia’s secretary of state from 2010 to 2018, Kemp purposelessly and maliciously “suppressed” voters in minority communities. The term “voter suppression” is itself a pejorative coined by Democrats to smear GOP efforts to root out election fraud.

But as noted by Rich Lowry, the editor of deceased conservative icon William F. Buckley Jr.’s National Review, there was no so-called “voter suppression” in Georgia.

He explained that while 214 precincts have indeed closed in Georgia since 2012, they closed either because of a lack of cash, a desire to consolidate precincts or an attempt to eliminate “underutilized polling places and locations that don’t comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act.”

Lowry also addressed claims that Kemp interfered in voter registration, pointing out that it’s a state law that requires that a voter’s registration information match his or her driver’s license, state ID card or Social Security records.

It’s likewise a state law — one seen in other states such as Ohio as well — that forces voters to be eliminated from the ballot rolls if they fail to vote after a certain period of time.

“Every indication is that Stacey Abrams lost fair and square in an election where everyone knew the rules beforehand, and they weren’t unreasonable,” Lowry opined.

Yet Abrams refused time and time again Sunday to concede, no matter how many times host Jake Tapper, who looked befuddled at her responses, pressed her for a more definitive answer.

“He is the person who won the adequate number of votes to become the governor,” she said when asked be by the host where Kemp is now Georgia’s “legitimate governor-elect.”

“You’re not using the word legitimate. Is he the legitimate governor-elect of Georgia?” Tapper pressed.

“He is the legal governor of Georgia,” Abrams replied. “Words have meaning. I spent my lifetime not only as an attorney but as a writer and I’m careful of the words I choose.”

“What you are looking for me to say is that there was no compromise of our democracy and there should be some political compromise in the language I use and that’s not right. What’s not right is saying that something was done properly when it was not.”

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Her rhetoric on social media before, during and after the election have echoed this sentiment.

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Judging by the reactions below, however, there are plenty of folks who don’t buy her narrative:

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