Firestorm erupts when GOP senator throws major curveball into Kavanaugh confirmation plans

Senate Republicans are so confident they have the votes to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court that some of them made other plans for the weekend.

Senator Steve Daines stirred premature glee among Democrats and mass panic among Republicans when he said he won’t be in Washington this weekend to vote for Kavanaugh because he’s attending his daughter’s wedding in Montana on October 6.

 

However, Daines told Fox News that two things will happen this weekend: He’s going to walk his daughter down the aisle AND Judge Kavanaugh will be confirmed.  Daines said he reassured Kavanaugh, “I’m going to be there to vote for you, as needed.”

Daines explained that he will return to Washington IF his vote is needed, because the Senate can hold the vote open to accommodate extenuating circumstances like a wedding or a family emergency.

“Votes are held open all the time on the floor of the U.S. Senate once the vote is called,” Daines said. “The magic number is 50. We need to get to that tomorrow [Oct. 5], and then we need to get to 50 on Saturday [Oct. 6].”

As BizPac Review previously reported, the FBI’s record seventh investigation of Brett Kavanaugh reportedly failed to corroborate any of the 11th hour sexual misconduct allegations against him.

The Republicans holdouts — Jeff Flake, Susan Collins, and Lisa Murkowski — had vowed to vote for Kavanaugh if the latest FBI investigation turned up no new information against Kavanaugh.

And that’s exactly what happened, so they can now vote to confirm him with a clear conscience and without further delay.

Meanwhile, true to his background as a top student and competitive athlete, Brett Kavanaugh fought to the last second to clear his good name and reaffirm why he belongs on the highest court in the nation.

In an impassioned Wall Street Journal op-ed published late Thursday, Kavanaugh — who has been a federal judge since 2006 — wrote:

“You can count on me to be the same kind of judge and person I have been for my entire 28-year legal career: hardworking, even-keeled, open-minded, independent and dedicated to the Constitution and the public good. As a judge, I have always treated colleagues and litigants with the utmost respect.

I have been known for my courtesy on and off the bench. I have not changed. I will continue to be the same kind of judge I have been for the last 12 years.

I will remain optimistic, on the sunrise side of the mountain. I will continue to see the day that is coming, not the day that is gone.

I revere the Constitution. I believe that an independent and impartial judiciary is essential to our constitutional republic. If confirmed by the Senate to serve on the Supreme Court, I will keep an open mind in every case and always strive to preserve the Constitution of the United States and the American rule of law.”

This week in a nutshell:

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