More questions over Christine Ford’s contradictory opening statement; Dershowitz calls for tough cross-examination

Christine Blasey Ford, the liberal professor who claims Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh groped her 36 years ago at a high school party, admits in her opening statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee that she doesn’t remember many details of the alleged incident.

“I truly wish I could provide detailed answers to all of the questions that have been and will be asked about how I got to the party, where it took place, and so forth,” Ford wrote in her opening statement. “I don’t have all the answers. And I don’t remember as much as I would like to.”

In the same breath, Ford — whose foggy, uncorroborated claims have severely undercut her credibility — then comically claims the night “has been seared” into her memory.

“But the details about that night that bring me here today are ones I will never forget,” Ford said. “They have been seared into my memory and have haunted me episodically as an adult.”

Christine Blasey Ford kept quiet about the alleged 1982 incident for the past 36 years, but now claims she came forward six weeks ago because she feels it’s her civic duty to smear Judge Kavanaugh.

Kavanaugh — who has cleared six FBI background checks — was confirmed to the D.C. federal appeals court in 2006. Before that, Kavanaugh was a former top aide in the George W. Bush White House from 2003 to 2006.

For some reason, Ford didn’t think it was her “civic duty” back then (when Kavanaugh was in daily contact with the leader of the free world) to come forward with her high-school groping claims.

“I am here today not because I want to be. I am terrified,” Ford says. “I am here because I believe it is my civic duty to tell you what happened to me while Brett Kavanaugh and I were in high school.”

Christine Blasey Ford’s maudlin opening statement is a stark contrast to that of Judge Brett Kavanaugh, who categorically denies all of her allegations, and said all he wants to do is clear his name.

And unlike Ford, Kavanaugh was prepared to testify anytime, anywhere, without preconditions.

“Eleven days ago, Dr. Ford publicly accused me of committing a serious wrong more than 36 years ago when we were both in high school. I denied the allegation immediately, unequivocally, and categorically,” Kavanaugh says. “The next day, I told this Committee that I wanted to testify as soon as possible, under oath, to clear my name.”

Kavanaugh then challenged critics to stack Ford’s uncorroborated decades-old allegations with the well-documented record of his career, which is unblemished and beyond reproach.

“The allegation of misconduct is completely inconsistent with the rest of my life. The record of my life, from my days in grade school through the present day, shows that I have always promoted the equality and dignity of women.

I categorically and unequivocally deny the allegation against me by Dr. Ford. I never had any sexual or physical encounter of any kind with Dr. Ford. I am not questioning that Dr. Ford may have been sexually assaulted by some person in some place at some time. But I have never done that to her or to anyone. I am innocent of this charge.”

Harvard Law professor Alan Dershowitz expressed concern that the female sex-crimes prosecutor who will question Christine Ford may take it too easy on her because she has rarely cross-examined witnesses. As BizPac Review previously reported, Rachel Mitchell, an experienced prosecutor, will question Ford.

“I want to see the greatest engine of truth ever invented used — namely, a cross-examination. And I’m worried that we don’t have the right people,” Dershowitz told Fox News host Tucker Carlson.

“The woman who has been hired to conduct the cross-examination has probably rarely ever cross-examined anybody. She’s a prosecutor. So this is a woman with 20 years of experience as a prosecutor but no experience as a defense attorney, so I don’t think she’s the right person to question Dr. Ford.”

 

Dershowitz continued: “There needs to be cross-examination not only of her, but of the new Michael Avenatti allegation. That affidavit is so deeply flawed and open-ended that good defense attorney would be able to tear that apart in 30 seconds. It’s an embarrassment to the law that anyone would file an affidavit like that filled with hearsay…All Avenatti cares about is getting the headline. And the headline has been gotten.”

Dershowitz, a lifelong liberal, said the Senate Judiciary Committee should postpone voting on Kavanaugh’s confirmation, but underscored that the attorney questioning Christine Ford must be tough and pull no punches.

“Cross-examination must be effective and it must be tough,” Dershowitz said. “You can be respectful and tough. But do not pull punches. There is so much at stake here. A man’s life, his reputation, his career, his family, the women and their credibility.”

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