Sister in comedy Mo’Nique’s gushing first-hand defense of non-racist Roseanne brings out haters

As a sometimes-crass comedian herself, the hilarious entertainer known as Mo’Nique recognizes that tasteless jokes that are poorly received by an audience should never be used to define a comedian’s character. Suffice it to say, every comedian or wannabe comedian has told a bad joke at least one in his or her life, including Mo’Nique.

It’s for this reason that the 19-year-old veteran of the TV and comedy industry continues to support fellow comedian Roseanne Barr, whom she described as her “sister in comedy,” and whose career came to a screeching halt in May after she, Roseanne, posted a crass and allegedly racist joke to Twitter about Obama-era adviser Valerie Jarrett.

“We’ve all said and done things, baby, that we wish we could take back and swallow and say, ‘Oh.’ But when you’re in the public eye, you can’t and it’s out there,” she explained during an interview this week with Los Angeles station KTLA. “But to put the title of ‘racist’ on her…”

That’s not right, Mo’Nique argued, especially in light of Roseanne’s history of kindness and generosity toward members of the black community, including her.

“I remember when I had the ‘Mo’Nique Show,’ and there were big, major black superstar talent that had white representatives and they told their talent, ‘That show is too black and we really don’t want you to go on there,'” she said, referencing a late-night talk show she hosted from 2009 to 2010.

“But there was a white woman named Roseanne Barr that showed up for me … And she came and she set on that sofa and they didn’t hear the conversation when the cameras wasn’t rolling. And that woman was giving me some beautiful words,” Mo’Nique added, describing the words of encouragement Roseanne had for her at the time.

Her point was that even though Roseanne “made a mistake,” it seems senseless for society to merely “throw her away,” particularly over nothing but a lousy joke that Roseanne has formally apologized for.

“I apologize. I never meant to hurt anybody or say anything negative about an entire race of people. My 30 years of work can attest to that,” Roseanne said during a Fox News interview that aired Friday evening on “Hannity.”

The interview with host Sean Hannity reportedly wound up drawing a whopping 3.1 million in viewers, making “Hannity” the fifth most-watched program on television for that evening, according to Nielsen Media Research.

“[W]e keep teaching all of this Christianity and all of this forgiveness, but when we’re right in it, when we’re right in it, we seem to forget about that, and we seem to walk away from it,” Mo’Nique continued during her KTLA appearance.

“So to Roseanne Barr from Mo’Nique, I want to say to my sister that I love you. I know you made a mistake. I know you messed up, but I still won’t throw you away. I won’t put you on a racist list and say, ‘Oh, never again!’ That is my sister.”

Roseanne isn’t a racist. She’s just someone who made a bad joke. For a glimpse of real racism, observe how some on social media reacted after Mo’Nique shared her opinion with KTLA:

For an even better glimpse of racism, watch how leftists — some of them whiter than chalk — denigrated black Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott as an “Uncle Tom” and “coon” after he recently criticized the NFL’s ongoing national anthem protest, saying “[i]t takes away from the joy and the love that football brings a lot of people”:

These are the same sorts of people who now hate Roseanne Barr with a passion because she told a perceived-to-be racist joke months earlier.

Newflash: These tweets are far more emblematic of genuine racism than anything Roseanne has ever done or said, not that any liberal hypocrite will ever admit as much.

 

Vivek Saxena

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