RNC official quits over party’s support for Roy Moore

Not every Republican is happy about a prospective GOP win in Alabama on Tuesday.

A Republican National Committee Official stepped down from her role on Monday due to the RNC’s support of the Roy Moore Senate campaign in Alabama, AP reports.

(AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Joyce Simmons, the GOP national committeewoman from Nebraska, announced her resignation by email, writing:

“I strongly disagree with the recent RNC financial support directed to the Alabama Republican Party for use in the Roy Moore race.”

Simmons said she wished she could continue her service “to the national Republican Party that I used to know well.”

The RNC pulled support for Moore after two allegations of sexually-assaulting minors in the 1970s arose, along with stories that he dated several underage girls (who were of Alabama’s age of consent) when he was in his thirties.

But the party restored financial backing after President Donald Trump endorsed Moore. The President has continually voiced the need for Republicans to win the Alabama Senate seat once occupied by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. He has coupled his support for Moore with deep criticism of Democratic candidate Doug Jones.

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/940584383605563392

President Trump’s support for Moore is in contrast to other prominent voices in the Republican party, who have called on the candidate to resign amid the allegations.

Supporters of Moore have criticized the claims of one of Moore’s accusers, Beverly Young Nelson, who alleged the Republican groped her and tried to force her to perform oral sex on him in 1978 when she was 16.

Nelson and her lawyer, Glorida Allred, presented a high school yearbook allegedly signed by Moore as evidence. Last week, Nelson admitted to writing “notes” underneath Moore’s alleged signature in the yearbook after originally saying the entire yearbook message was penned by the judge-turned Senate candidate.

Image: Screenshot

Voters are unsure what to expect. A Fox News poll on Monday gave Jones a 10-point lead in the race. But an Emerson poll from earlier in the day put Moore ahead by nine points.

The Alabama Senate race may prove reminiscent of the 2016 election night, with Americans on the edge of their seats until the final votes are counted.

Comments

Latest Articles