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Celebs, ‘horrified’ by shiny new racial cause, create false hype about missing minority women

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More than a dozen girls of color are missing in the U.S. capital area, according to numerous celebrities and public figures, even though Washington, D.C. authorities question those figures.

Beneath a depiction of a milk carton proclaiming that 34 teenage girls are missing, “House” actress Olivia Wilde took to Instagram to announce that “It is deeply disturbing that the disappearance of dozens of young girls is ‘business as usual’ in our nation’s capital, my childhood home.”

It is deeply disturbing that the disappearance of dozens of young girls is “business as usual” in our nation’s capital, my childhood home. The response that these numbers aren’t any higher than normal should only make us more horrified. Kids of color have been unrecognized and uncared for by law enforcement, the education system (as a whole, not the heroic teachers working hard every day for far too little pay), and government in general, for far too long. It’s a deeply rooted issue, ingrained in our sadly flawed social fabric, but it is within our power to CHANGE IT. It starts with us demanding justice, demanding equal media coverage, and voting with vulnerable kids in mind, instead of dollar signs and fear. #findourgirls

A post shared by Olivia Wilde (@oliviawilde) on

“The response that these numbers aren’t any higher than normal should only make us more horrified,” she continued.

Here is a little context from Daily Caller News Foundation:

Hysteria about missing girls kicked off after the Metropolitan Police Department began more aggressively posting cases to social media, which gave the impression of a stunning and dramatic increase of missing girls in D.C. This led to the creation of several viral graphics alleging that 14 black girls had disappeared a single day, a claim that was repeated by black celebrities and rappers on social media. Some social media users also forwarded the theory that human trafficking was behind the disappearance of black girls.

Both claims, according to police, are totally false, but that has not assuaged the worries of the black community, prompting members of Congress to write a letter to the Department of Justice and Federal Bureau of Investigation, asking them to identify if the recent cases of missing girls are indicative of a serious problem, or rather an anomaly.

Police say that not a single case of a missing child in 2017 was due to either human or sex trafficking.

Former South Carolina lawmaker Bakari Sellers referred to the spike as the number one story in America, despite reducing the number of missing girls from 34 to 14.

The Women’s March published a statement stating that they are “deeply disturbed by the shocking number of missing Black and Latina girls in the Washington, DC area,” and called upon Capitol Hill lawmakers to demand that the Department of Justice launch an investigation into their disappearance.

Women’s March also sent out a tweet using the hashtag #MissingDCGirls, which was immediately picked up by rapper James Todd Smith, better known as LL Cool J, with a request that it keep trending.

Politini radio program co-host Danielle Moodie-Mills added a claim that the 14 young girls of color disappeared within a 24-hour period, although one of the girls she featured on her photo had actually been missing since 2014.

Real Beverly Hills Housewife Kyle Richards wondered why news media hadn’t picked up the story and that it was only through social media that she’d heard of it.

“Real Housewives of Beverly Hills” is produced by Bravo TV, and Bravo executive Andy Cohen thought the situation was beyond comprehension. He tweeted:

Eventually, it did catch the attention of TMZ’s Harvey Levin, who sent out this video message, which LL Cool J re-tweeted.

“There has got to be an enormous investigation that has got to start today,” Levin pleaded.

The rapper eventually thanked his followers for making #MissingDCGirls go viral on social media, and implored everyone to keep the pressure on authorities.

And keep the pressure up they did. Even though Washington, D.C. police saw no spike in girls missing from the metropolitan area, the city’s mayor announced that he was launching a special investigation into the matter anyway.

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