Anti-cop picture still stirring trouble in DC: ‘We might just have to kick somebody’s a** and stop them’

Beginning Monday, there has been a steady back-and-forth of a controversial painting depicting law enforcement officers as pigs that was hung by Rep. William Lacy Clay in the capital complex’s public areas.

The Missouri Democrat found that the painting had been removed from its prominent public location and returned to his office Monday — the work of Rep. Duncan Hunter, a California Republican and former Marine.

Clay was infuriated and called Hunter’s activity an act of theft. Not so fast, Skippy. When the object is returned to you, that’s not theft.

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Moreover, Monday happened to be National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day, and displaying that particular painting was no way to show appreciation for those who place their lives on the line for us each day.

Clay returned the painting — the work of a high school student meant to depict police-community relations in Ferguson, Missouri after the shooting death of Michael Brown and the ensuing riots — to public display. Clay also found it ironic that constitutional conservatives would want to stifle freedom of expression.

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Since then, the painting has been the subject of a ping-pong volley, With Republican lawmakers removing it and Clay and the Congressional Black Caucus returning to to what they feel is its rightful place.

The second instance turned out to be the work of Rep. Doug Lamborn, a Colorado Republican, who said he hopes others will take up the mantle.

But Clay disagreed and hung it again.

To be fair, the painting was first displayed in June, but wasn’t removed until Monday, January 9 — National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day.

Tuesday evening, Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Cedric L. Richmond was asked whether the painting needed security personnel to protect it. He had another idea.

“We might just have to kick somebody’s a– and stop them,” was his reply.

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We all believe in the First Amendment’s freedom of expression provisions, but when that expression perpetuates a lie and does nothing other than to further divide the races it’s tough to swallow.

After the Ferguson shooting then-Attorney General Eric Holder sent a team of investigators to that St. Louis suburb after a grand jury found Officer Darren Wilson, the shooting officer, blameless.

The investigators found that Wilson acted within the law and that the “hands up, don’t shoot” narrative was all a lie.

One suggested that if the Ferguson painting can be on display, why not other things.

Why not?

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