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Kamala Harris’ niece gives timely advice to parents on how to teach ‘anti-racism’ at home

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Vice President Kamala Harris’ niece has written an op-ed that was published in The Washington Post offering parents advice on how to teach “anti-racism” at home while blasting Republican-controlled legislatures for banning the teaching of critical race theory in public schools.

Meena Harris accused GOP legislatures of preventing teachers from “discussing racism, equity and justice in classrooms” while also ripping Democrat-run states for allegedly failing to develop “explicit plans to discuss anti-racism with an audience ready (and eager!) to learn about it.”

“All to say, public schools have long failed to acknowledge the history and realities of racism. The recent right-wing crusade against ‘critical race theory’ — a term so frightening its opponents dare not even learn what it means — is the latest manifestation of that deeply rooted trend,” Harris wrote in the piece published on Monday.

“In the face of such daunting challenges, what are parents to do? Until and unless we see systemic change to properly desegregate our children’s schools and un-whitewash the curriculum, we need to fill the gaps ourselves,” she added.

Harris prodded families around the country to “start taking time at home to discuss the injustices that shaped our nation’s past, the work still to be done in our present, and the values that should define our future,” and she identified “kids’ bookshelves” as a starting point for parents while pushing them to look for books featuring black and brown people.

She then went on to claim that “racism” is continuing to shape “society,” while accusing “many” schools of skipping “curriculum” that combats the issue.

“Titles that teach kids to value — not just tolerate — each other’s differences are certainly important. But with many of our schools failing to offer a curriculum or environment that combats racism, simply reading representative books to our kids isn’t enough,” Harris lectured.

“Parents need to share narratives with their children that are historically accurate and anti-racist. They need to tell stories that say what politicians are afraid to, and what so many teachers now can’t: that this country was stolen from Indigenous people, founded by white supremacists, and built on the backs of enslaved people — and that racism shapes our society to this day,” she claimed.

Earlier this year, the veep’s niece defended the teaching of critical race theory in primary school classrooms, but many parents have rejected the curriculum, saying that it pushes narratives and falsehoods about whites and that it is racially divisive.

“Parents are right to revolt against critical race theory in the classroom,” CRT researcher Chris Rufo, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, said in June.

“Children are not inherently ‘oppressors’ and should not be implicated for historical crimes on the basis of their race. That’s the kind of propaganda that belongs in a Soviet history museum—not American K-12 classrooms,” he added.

“CRT holds that America is fundamentally racist, yet it teaches people to view every social interaction and person in terms of race. Its adherents pursue ‘antiracism’ through the end of merit, objective truth and the adoption of race-based policies,” The Daily Caller noted, describing the theory in general terms.

Many school districts are “asking teachers to adjust homework assignments according to a child’s skin color,” teaching “that Americans who are white have unfair privileges and the ‘legacy of white supremacy endures,’” and dividing students “into affinity groups by race for school activities,” according to Jonathan Butcher, a Will Skillman Fellow in Education at The Heritage Foundation.

In closing her piece, Meena Harris claimed that it is “crucial” that “white classmates” of students of color “learn about our country’s past and the way it informs our present — so they can be strong, anti-racist allies both inside and outside of the classroom.”

“Parents and children alike could benefit from cracking open a book like ‘Born on the Water’ or ‘Your Legacy.’ Because far more powerful than any attempt to erase history is a movement of conscientious families willing to face it head on,” she wrote.

Jon Dougherty

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