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Want to see uncomfortable? Watch a black reporter ask white people for money at a pro-reparations rally

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A recent so-called march for reparations to African people got an unexpected twist when participants were hilariously challenged to put their money where their mouth is.

The Uhuru Solidarity Movement’s national day for African reparations earlier this month was the target of a satirical report from YouTube journalist Andrew Callaghan on his show named “Channel 5.”

Callaghan sent fellow journalist ‘Sidam’ to the Uhuru pro-reparations rally in Oakland, California where white protesters didn’t hesitate to give him money to assuage their perceived privileged guilt.

The Uhuru Solidarity Movement held marches and rallies in five American cities on Oct. 16 for Africa reparations. Channel 5 focused on the one in Oakland which has a predominantly black demographic. The organization’s slogan is, “White solidarity with black power.”

The man-on-the-street style interviews, ironically conducted at a location called Snow Park. were tongue-in-cheek and apparently very profitable for Sidam who also noted that most of the protesters were broke.

“It’s a bunch of white people who believe in African reparations. They want to give us money so we’ll get some money,” he said at the beginning of the experiment, and he could not contain his laughter as he pressed forward.

Members of the movement claim that white Americans owe money to black citizens and if they won’t give them money, they’ll come and take it.

One white protester holding up a sign indicating he loves Gaza said, “The United States of America was built on stolen land and stolen labor. The African People’s Socialist Party was putting forward the figure of $4.1 trillion in unpaid labor. It’s really about we as white people confronting our privilege in this system. And not just confronting it ideologically, but confronting it actually by giving back.”

The African People’s Socialist Party is behind the Uhuru Solidarity Movement.

Sidam then asked the man for $5. The guy asked him, “Are you serious?” and Sidam responded, “Yes.” The man wound up not giving him the money because he didn’t have change.

Next up in the interview, a woman stated, “We’re here marching for reparations for African people. We want reparations.”

Sidam asked her for $5 and since she only had $20 that’s what he got. He told her he loved her and she said she loved him back as he laughed.

The next woman was with the Freedom Socialist Party. Socialism seemed to be the underlying connection during the event.

She said, “We’re with the Freedom Socialist Party. So we’re a socialist, feminist, anti-racist international party, again coming from an anti-capitalist perspective. We do think that redistributing the wealth is gonna need to happen for any liberation to really happen.”

Sidam asked her for $5 and she laughed at him. She equivocated by saying, “That’s not the massive reparations. Where it comes from matters and it needs to be paid for by the people that have reaped the benefits.”

A second woman went on about reparations being a just demand because people were stolen from their countries. Both women contended it was the mega-corporations and the capitalist system that needed to pay. They claimed it’s all about taxing the rich.

Sidam interviewed a number of very odd individuals during the event in Oakland. But he unfailingly hit them all up for $5. One woman paid him via CashApp because she didn’t have any money on her.

He noted that most of the people attending the rally were not from Oakland. They were from other states altogether.

According to Callaghan, all the money collected at the event in Oakland was supposedly going to build a basketball court in St. Louis, Missouri. Sidam stated that it seemed extremely racist to him.

The Uhuru Solidarity Movement announced on their site that the cities where the marches took place would include Oakland, CA; St. Louis, MO; St. Petersburg, FL; Philadelphia, PA; and Portland, OR .

According to the Green Party in Philadelphia, their list of demands were as follows:

  • Philadelphia must provide housing for the homeless;
  • Temple, Penn, and Drexel Universities must pay reparations for their land-grabs from the community;
  • Philadelphia must pay reparations for the 1985 bombing of Osage Avenue and the incarceration of the Move 9;
  • the immediate release of Mumia Abu-Jamal; and
  • Philadelphia must pay reparations for “mass incarceration, police murder, violence of poverty, hostile colonial schools, and a genocidal healthcare system.”

In St. Petersburg, fliers were circulated stating the intention of the march was to “build unity with the African community’s demand for reparations for slavery, genocide, and colonial terror that continues to this day in the form of police murder, mass incarceration, and economic and healthcare disparities.”

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