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School board meeting takes awkward turn when TX mom rants about anal sex

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The mother of a Texas middle school student railed at the local school board last week, after discovering a book in the library describing anal sex, in a tirade that led officials to cut off her microphone.

Identified as Kara Bell, the mother ripped into members of the Lake Travis Independent School District board on Wednesday over details in a book by Ashley Hope Perez titled “Out of Darkness,” which she said talked about “p***y, anal sex, and saying ‘A Mexican is a Mexican, is a Mexican.”

Bell said one page of the book says, “Take her out back, we boys figured, then hands on the ti**ies.”

“Put it in her coin box, put it in her cornhole, grab a hold of that braid, rub that Calico,” the book also says.

Warning: Graphic language

After reading the passage, Bell told school board members she had to look up a reference to “cornhole,” because she knew the term as it relates to a bean bag toss game she owns and plays; it was then she found out it was slang for anal sex, she said.

“I do not want my children to learn about anal sex in middle school. I’ve never had anal sex, I don’t want to have anal sex. I don’t want my kids having anal sex,” she told members. “I want you to start focusing on education and not public health.”

After her microphone was cut off, Bell, herself a former school board candidate, continued to speak, demanding at one point to applause, “Do not teach them about anal sex!”

After the book was brought to the district’s attention, it was removed from the school library, according to local outlet KXAN.

“Lake Travis ISD received a call (unidentified) that there was material of a pornographic nature in our Hudson Bend Middle School library,” said an initial statement from the school.

After it was issued, officials with the district said the tome was taken off library shelves at Hudson Bend and Bee Cave Middle Schools; the materials in the book are going to be reviewed by school officials to see if they conform to the policy of the board. It’s not clear how the books wound up in the libraries or who was responsible for putting them there.

“A district possesses significant discretion to determine the content of its school libraries,” a district spokesperson told the outlet, citing policy. “A district must, however, exercise its discretion in a manner consistent with the First Amendment.”

“A district shall not remove materials from a library for the purpose of denying students access to ideas with which the district disagrees,” the spokesperson continued. “A district may remove materials because they are pervasively vulgar or based solely upon the educational suitability of the books in question.”

Perez’s book details a relationship between a young black male and a Mexican-American girl “against the backdrop of a horrific 1937 explosion in East Texas, which killed nearly 300 schoolchildren and teachers,” KXAN reported, citing an NBC News story chronicling the book after it was published.

“I hope they are kind of hungry for stories from people on the margins of history,” Perez told the news network after her tome was released.

“That’s really what I was trying to do with ‘Out of Darkness’ in the way I approached the explosion. I knew a lot of the historical details, but I was also trying to tell stories that reflect the marginal experiences by the (African American and Mexican American) characters,” she added.

Jon Dougherty

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