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CNN self-owns in eager buy into obit that claims unvaccinated to blame for vaccinated death

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It appears CNN has bought hook, line and sinker into the factually “pants on fire” inaccurate claim from the family of a now-deceased vaccinated woman that she died from the coronavirus because of the unvaccinated.

As previously reportedly and fact-checked, the family of Illinois woman Candace Ayers, 66, has been using her obituary to shame the unvaccinated.

“Candace Cay (Kruger) Ayers, 66, of Springfield, passed away on September 3, 2021 at St. John’s Hospital in Springfield, IL. She was preceded in death by more than 4,531,799 others infected with covid-19. She was vaccinated but was infected by others who chose not to be. The cost was her life,” the obituary reads.

It seems the obituary is nothing but left-wing political agitprop, because the actual science makes it clear that the vaccinated also “spread the virus,” meaning that Ayers didn’t necessarily contract the virus from the unvaccinated.

CNN nevertheless eagerly shared Ayers’ obituary with its audience in a way perceived to be favorable to the flawed, factually inaccurate and arguably anti-science claim:

While the network didn’t endorse the theory, either in the screenshot above or in its official write-up, it also failed to provide any pushback.

Critics noted that if Ayers’ family is to be believed, then the coronavirus vaccine does virtually nothing, rendering it a useless tool for combating the deadly virus.

In other words, the quote shared by CNN is the epitome of “anti-vax.”

The irony is that CNN is one of the most unabashedly pro-vaccine media networks in America, with its hosts constantly shaming the unvaccinated just like Ayers’ family.

Just this week, far-left host Don Lemon made the case that all unvaccinated Americans need to be called “stupid,” need to be peppered with “shame” and need to be outright shunned.

“And so I think I think we have to stop coddling people when it comes to this and the vaccine, saying you can’t shame them, you can’t call them stupid. Yes, they are. … The people who are not getting vaccines, who are believing the lies on the Internet instead of science, it’s time to start shaming them … or leave them behind,” he said.

This raises the question of whether CNN should be left “behind,” given that its reporting on Ayers’ obituary has convinced some anti-vaxxers that the coronavirus vaccine really doesn’t work.

To be clear, the vaccine does work extraordinarily well to stave off the chances of hospitalization and — more importantly — death.

Hospitalization and death rates among the vaccinated are significantly lower than among the unvaccinated, though exceptions do still happen. Exceptions are most likely to happen with those who suffer from preexisting conditions. Ayers suffered from such a condition: rheumatoid arthritis.

However, exceptions are very rare. In Pennsylvania, for instance, 97 percent of COVID deaths and 95 percent of hospitalizations have been among the unvaccinated, as reported in a press release published Tuesday.

But this doesn’t mean the vaccinated can’t contract the virus and spread it, which is something that neither Ayers’ family nor CNN seem to realize.

To answer the latter Twitter user’s question, they don’t know, which is why both the obituary and CNN’s reporting come off as “bullsh*t propaganda,” as one critic put it.

Vivek Saxena

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