Notre Dame fires back after ‘Fighting Irish’ mascot deemed racist

From racist boulders to offensive syrup and butter, everything must be canceled. This means you, Leprechaun!

The Quality Logo Products Blog has deemed the revered mascot of Notre Dame among the most offensive college mascots in America, based on recent polling. The leprechaun came in fourth place behind Hawaii’s Vili the Warrior, San Diego State’s Aztec Warrior and Florida State’s Osceola and Renegade.

But the university wasn’t having the ridiculous categorization, and in what has now become a rarity, they did not apologize.

“It is worth noting … that there is no comparison between Notre Dame’s nickname and mascot and the Indian and warrior names (and) mascots used by other institutions such as the NFL team formerly known as the Redskins,” the school said in a statement to the Indy Star on Monday, “None of these institutions were founded or named by Native Americans who sought to highlight their heritage by using names and symbols associated with their people.”

“Our symbols stand as celebratory representations of a genuine Irish heritage at Notre Dame. A heritage that we regard with respect, loyalty and affection.”

Back in 2018, Wall Street Journal columnist William McGurn appeared on Fox News’ “Fox and Friends”, where he reacted to a similarly absurd contention that the “Fighting Irish” logo – which is a cartoon – is racist.

Amplified by the grotesque summer of 2020, sports team names, nicknames and mascots have come under the ire of misguided petulant children trying to whitewash history, aka, Marxist leftists, aka, the average college professor. The Washington Redskins changed their name to the ultra-creative “Washington Football Team” and the Cleveland Indians have plans to change their name to the Guardians next season.

The Kansas City Chiefs and Atlanta Braves have faced scrutiny as well, but neither has announced any plans to change their team names. The Chiefs did capitulate some however, retiring their horse “Warpaint”, and the Braves have discouraged fans from doing the tomahawk chop during games.

The blog described its methodology in coming to their conclusions:

“The study was conducted online with a total of 1,266 participants. All were encouraged to set aside any personal feelings they may have about the teams represented and focus solely on the mascots.

There were 128 mascots in the survey — representing all colleges and universities with NCAA Division 1 football teams that have costumed characters. Not all survey participants viewed every mascot. The 128 mascots were divided among 16 survey questions, each with eight randomized variations. Every survey taker evaluated at least 16 mascots. Each mascot was scored at least 150 times. Questions included multiple-choice rating scales and open-ended comment boxes.”

It is worthy of note that the first-place winner of the “offensive” category, Florida State University, has been endorsed by the Seminole Tribe of Florida in their use of the name and representation.

Frank Webster

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