‘Actual racism and sexism’: NYT Mag’s warning on ‘March of the Karens’ does NOT go over well

While there’s plenty of speculation about how college campuses are little more than left-wing indoctrination centers, there may be too little attention paid to the role the major news outlets play in shaping minds.

Look no further than a piece titled, “The March of the Karens,” that was featured in the New York Times Style Magazine.

In effect, the author, Ligaya Mishan, the daughter of a Filipino mother and a British father, suggests that all white women are “Karens,”  which the article explains is “an entitled and belligerent white woman.”

“In recent years, ‘Karen’ has become an epithet for a type of interfering, hectoring white woman, the self-appointed hall monitor unloosed on the world, so assured of her status in society that she doesn’t hesitate to summon the authorities — demanding to speak to the manager or calling the police — for the most trivial and often wholly imaginary transgressions,” Mishan wrote.

She noted that the name is “a relic of an older, more conservative America,” yet takes a scattergun approach to claim it’s a “bipartisan” phenomenon, tagging “the liberal white girlfriend perfectly at ease dissing the cop who asks her black boyfriend for I.D., counting on her whiteness to prevent violence.”

Mishan names both former TV host Megyn Kelly and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., in her dissertation.

“Widen the lens and any white woman — every white woman — could be a Karen, if she’s perceived as taking for granted the advantages bestowed by her skin color and ignoring the labor and suffering of others,” she penned.

The important thing here seemingly being for white women to submit to the guilt of having been born white in the quest to “find our way from this world to a better one,” as our heroine concluded.

“Still, if Karen is a potentiality in every privileged woman — and I include myself here, as a half-white, half-Filipino woman of a certain education and class, ever alert for the Karen within — she also represents an opportunity: to question ourselves and how we move through the world, beyond just feeling mournful and vaguely sorry,” she wrote.

Suffice it to say, the intellectual drivel didn’t go over well online. Here’s a sampling of responses to the story from Twitter:

Tom Tillison

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