Elite NYC schools make it clear the next generation of educators needs to be ‘woke’

A number of once highly-sought elite schools in New York City are on the lookout for more ‘woke’ applicants as they seek to usher in the next generation of educators who are accepting of highly controversial “anti-racist” curriculum such as critical race theory.

An analysis of current job applications by the New York Post found that Ethical Culture Fieldston School is “leading the way” in their current hunt for a ballet teacher “committed to challenging Western dance forms and the hierarchical and pedagogical practices that often center whiteness in dance classrooms and on stages,” according to a posted job description online.

The subject of science is also being politicized at the Bronx school, where parents pay annual tuition of $55,510 per year: A job listing for an upper school biology instructor notes that applicants are expected to have “an understanding of and commitment to cultural competency, and how to support a diverse student population, especially through teaching more inclusive science curricula,” according to The Post.

The paper added that no one from the elite school responded to a reporter’s request to define “inclusive science curricula.”

Meanwhile, there are similar job descriptions for educators in STEM — science, technology, engineering, and math — subjects at another top institution, Grace Church School, which is located in downtown Manhattan and charges parents $57,330 per student per year. There, Math and Science Center consultants should possess a “commitment to antiracism and accessibility of student education for diverse learners.”

And one responsibility for a secretary’s position at the Riverdale Country School, which charges $58,350 a year, will be to proofread and edit report cards to ensure that proper pronouns are utilized.

It’s not clear how the new generation of ‘woke’ educators will weave critical race theory, defined as “a worldview that believes that everything in public and private life must be considered with respect to racial identities,” by Jonathan Butcher, an education fellow at the Heritage Foundation, into the subject curriculum and still hold true to scientific, technological, and mathematical absolutes.

“It’s not just a question of are we appropriately discussing race in schools, it is a call to action to make students be ever alert and constantly searching for evidence that may or may not be there or some form of discrimination everywhere their lives,” Butcher told The Post. “It’s a recipe for a very cynical, pessimistic and defeatist attitude.”

But it’s clear that the elite NYC school administrators are attempting to push their ideology early and often; a number of job applications at their institutions suggest that racially indoctrinating kids ought to start when they are young. For instance, at Riverdale, an opening for a Lower School associate teacher position says applicants have to be “committed to work in the areas of equity, justice, and inclusion” — whatever they mean.

The Trinity School, located on New York City’s Upper West Side and charging $58,505, is looking for educators under the same premises.

“Candidates need … to create an equitable classroom culture inclusive of varied student experiences as well as an awareness of how race, gender, and other aspects of identity manifest themselves in the early childhood classroom,” says a job description for elementary school teachers. The school further states that it is “expressly committed to becoming an anti-racist institution.”

In an interview with The Post, Trinity spokesman Kevin Ramsey explained the standards.

“We have a diverse student body and on a daily basis, we want to make sure that all students in every classroom feel safe and loved,” he said.

It’s not clear if The Post asked whether school administrators felt they were not already living up to those standards or what made the new standards necessary.

One parent of the elite Spence School groused: “You graduate and all you can talk about is race and justice, but can you do math and science?”

Jon Dougherty

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