Biden’s chilling announcement of door to door vaccine push causes defiant backlash

Amid a continued focus on the Delta variant of COVID-19, President Joe Biden let it be known Tuesday the administration will send people “door to door, literally knocking on doors,” to coax people into getting the vaccine.

The new campaign comes as Biden fell short of his Fourth of July goal of having 70 percent of the U.S. adult population with at least one shot of the coronavirus vaccine, and it’s not going over very well with many Americans.

Right on cue, The New York Times stepped forward to lend a hand, essentially telling readers that as extreme as it may sound to have the government knocking on your door, it’s maybe the least of necessary efforts.

“But top health experts say that it is simply not enough, and that the president needs to take the potentially unpopular step of encouraging states, employers and colleges and universities to require vaccinations to slow the spread of the coronavirus,” the newspaper reported.

“Please get vaccinated now. It works. It’s free,” Biden pleaded from the White House. “It’s never been easier, and it’s never been more important. Do it now for yourself and the people you care about, for your neighborhood, for your country. It sounds corny, but it’s a patriotic thing to do.”

The president referenced the press briefing held earlier in the day when White House press secretary Jen Psaki spoke about a five-step plan being implemented.

(Video: ABC News)

“In today’s briefing we discussed how our administration is going to devote the remainder of the summer to a special focus on five ways to make gains and getting those of you who are unvaccinated vaccinated,” Biden said. “Because here’s the deal. We are continuing to wind down the mass vaccination sites that did so much in the spring to rapidly vaccinate those eager to get their first shot, and their second shot for that matter, if they needed a second. Now we need to go to community by community, neighborhood by neighborhood, and oftentimes door to door, literally knocking on doors to get help to the remaining people, protected from the virus.”

Citing the Delta variant, Psaki said the administration “will continue its effort to work with governors, local leaders, and across the public and private sector to get more Americans vaccinated by making vaccines available in more health care settings and respond to hotspots.”

She spoke on the five-step plan being implemented, beginning with the door to door campaign, as seen here:

Here are her remarks on the specific details of the plan:

“One, targeted community by community, door-to-door outreach to get remaining Americans vaccinated by ensuring they have the information they need on how both safe and accessible the vaccine is. Two, a renewed emphasis on getting the vaccines to more primary care doctors and physicians, something that we’ve seen as a very successful tactic with reaching groups with lower vaccination rates in the past few months. Three, stepped up efforts, which is complementary to my last point, to get vaccines to pediatricians and other providers who serve younger people, so that adolescents aged 12 to 18 can get vaccinated as they go for back to school checkups or get ready for fall sports. Four, continue expanding efforts to make the vaccine accessible for workers, access is an area where we’ve seen as a challenge and one where, as we’ve worked to address it, we’ve seen increase in rates. So that includes setting up vaccination clinics at workplaces and PTO, or leave that employees can take off to get vaccinated. And finally, expanding our mobile clinic efforts, meeting people where they are and making sure we’re taking the vaccine to communities.”

 

It’s not like skeptics did not already abound, and given stories such as a healthy 17-year-old high school student developing a heart condition after taking the first dose of the Pfizer vaccine, who can blame people for being leery.

One such skeptic, U.S. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, the lightning rod Republican from Georgia, went so far as to accurately point out that the COVID-19 vaccine has yet to be approved by the FDA — the vaccine was issued under an emergency use authorization.

Taking to Twitter, Greene claimed the vaccine is being used as “a political tool used to control people.”

“People have a choice, they don’t need your medical brown shirts showing up at their door ordering vaccinations,” she said. “You can’t force people to be part of the human experiment.”

The reference to “brown shirts” comes on the heels of the freshman GOP lawmaker’s controversial response to Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., continuing a mask mandate in the House. Greene likened the effort to “a time in history where people were told to wear a gold star and they were definitely treated like second class citizens, so much so that they were put in trains and taken to gas chambers in Nazi Germany.”

Greene was not the only lawmaker pushing back on the government sending people to knock on doors, as seen here:

The lawmakers were far from alone in expressing their concerns. Here’s a sampling of other responses to the story from Twitter:

Tom Tillison

Comments

Latest Articles