‘I fought very hard for them’: Trump ‘very disappointed’ with SCOTUS Justices Kavanaugh, Coney Barrett

Former President Donald Trump said during an interview on Real America’s Voice that he was “very disappointed” with a number of recent rulings by Supreme Court Justices Amy Coney Barrett and Brett Kavanaugh.

Both Barrett and Kavanaugh voted to uphold ObamaCare on Wednesday, confirming the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act by a 7-2 margin. Justice Samuel Alito was joined by Justice Neil Gorsuch in dissent.

“I fought very hard for them,” Trump told Just the News’ Water Cooler on Monday. “But I was very disappointed with a number of their rulings.”

The former president told host David Brody that he’s not indulging second thoughts about having nominated the conservative justices to the court.

“Second guessing does no good,” he noted. “But I was disappointed with a number of rulings that they made.”

Earlier this year, Barrett and Kavanaugh did not support a call for the court to hear a challenge to the 2020 presidential election in Pennsylvania — Justices Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas and Neil Gorsuch supported a challenge.

Trump was critical of the Supreme Court back in December, calling it a “disgraceful miscarriage of justice” when the high court rejected a Texas lawsuit seeking to throw out voting results from four states in the 2020 election. Trump’s three appointees to the court voted against the effort.

“The Supreme Court had ZERO interest in the merits of the greatest voter fraud ever perpetrated on the United States of America,” Trump tweeted at the time.

Last week’s ruling in favor of former President Barack Obama’s signature health care plan is seen by many as the last attempt to kill the law.

The Supreme Court ruled the plaintiffs had no standing in a case from Republican governors and attorneys general, which was backed by the previous administration, who asked that Obamacare be stuck down after the GOP successfully eliminated the individual mandate in 2017.

“The argument follows from a 2012 case against the ACA mandate that all Americans get insured, or else face a monetary penalty,” MarketWatch reported, of the ruling. “In a 5-4 decision, conservative Chief Justice John Roberts, joined by the court’s four liberals, then wrote an opinion ruling the law was constitutional because the mandate was actually a constitutional exercise of the government’s right to tax, not an unconstitutional requirement that all Americans must purchase a product on the marketplace. With the erasure of the penalty for those lacking insurance, supporters of California v. Texas say the previous justification for the law’s constitutionality has been eliminated.”

Trump successfully appointed three justices to the high court, which will likely be his greatest legacy when looked back upon by future historians. As noted above, his third appointee, Gorsuch, voted in dissent.

The Republican Party’s most promising effort to overturn the Affordable Care Act came in 2017, and fell short when the late Sen. John McCain, who has already been diagnosed with brain cancer, made his dramatic “thumbs down” vote.

McCain went against GOP leadership and Trump — the dislike between the two men being well established — in voting against the so-called “skinny repeal” of Obamacare.

The Senate voted 51-49 against the legislation, with McCain joined by Republican Sens. Susan Collins, Maine, and Lisa Murkowski, Alaska.

“From the beginning, I have believed that Obamacare should be repealed and replaced with a solution that increases competition, lowers costs, and improves care for the American people,” he said in a statement at the time. “The so-called ‘skinny repeal’ amendment the Senate voted on today would not accomplish those goals. While the amendment would have repealed some of Obamacare’s most burdensome regulations, it offered no replacement to actually reform our health care system and deliver affordable, quality health care to our citizens.

Tom Tillison

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