Rocker Gwen Stefani disses mob narrative and the woke ‘rules’ that are ‘dividing us’

A promising sign amid all the angst over today’s hypersensitive woke generation is that slowly but surely, rational people, to include those with a more liberal mindset, are beginning to recognize the insanity at play in America today.

In a new interview with Paper Magazine, Grammy-winning recording artist Gwen Stefani seemingly yearned for times before social media dictated thought, a time of less division and “much more freedom.”

Stefani pushed back against the claim that she’s been “appropriating” Japanese street fashion through the “Harajuku Girls” dancers, a group of Japanese-American women known for their unique style — her affinity for the dancers reportedly stems from her father, who used to travel to Japan for work and bring back gifts.

“I had this idea that I would have a posse of girls — because I never got to hang with girls — and they would be Japanese, Harajuku girls, because those are the girls that I love. Those are my homies,” Stefani said. “That’s where I would be if I had my dream come true, I could go live there and I could go hang out in Harajuku.”

She talked about how sharing different cultures brings us together.

“If we didn’t buy and sell and trade our cultures in, we wouldn’t have so much beauty, you know?” Stefani said in the interview released Wednesday. “We learn from each other, we share from each other, we grow from each other. And all these rules are just dividing us more and more.”

It was at this point that the musical artist talked about the impact of social media.

“I think that we grew up in a time where we didn’t have so many rules,” she said. “We didn’t have to follow a narrative that was being edited for us through social media, we just had so much more freedom.”

While she didn’t use the term, the remark speaks of the “cancel culture” ushered in by today’s woke society.

As for her politics, Stefani sees that as a personal thing. A stance that harkens back to a time when actors and entertainers — and the sports world — respected fans enough to keep their personal views to themselves, not wanting to offend those who may hold a differing point of view.

“The whole point of voting, is you have this personal space to feel how you feel,” she explained. “I use my platform to share my life story and to engage with people and to exchange whatever gift I was giving. I’m not a political science major. I am not that person. Everyone knows that. So why would I even talk about it?”

Stefani mentioned the obsession many have with being a “bully” on social media over their personal views when referencing her break out hit, “Just a Girl,” released in Sept. 1995, to say that it wasn’t political.

“I was very sheltered growing up with my family. I wasn’t political. I wasn’t angry,” she told Paper. “Even now, I don’t need to go on Instagram and say ‘girl power.’ I just need to live and be a good person and leave a trail of greatness behind me.”

“Stop talking about it and stop trying to bully everybody about it. Just do it. And that’s how I feel like I’ve lived my life,” she added.

Or, as Elvis one put it, “A little less conversation, a little more action, please.”

Tom Tillison

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