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‘It leaves out a lot’: Black Illinois school board candidate blasts race-obsessed curriculum

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A black candidate for an Evanston, Ill., school board says she disapproves of “Black Lives Matter” curriculum being pushed in the district because she believes it is unbalanced and harmful to her children.

Ndona Muboyayi, a native of the city, told “Fox & Friends” on Friday that she discovered the BLM materials when she and her family returned to Evanston a few years ago.

Earlier, Muboyayi, a candidate for District 65, told The Atlantic that she opposed the BLM curriculum because she believes it pushes a narrative that black people in the U.S. can’t get ahead due solely to white supremacy.

“I gave my children and my husband, who grew up in the Democratic Republic of Congo, this idea that it would be a place of both Black unity and people working together across color lines,” said Muboyayi, who grew up attending Evanston public schools and described it as “almost utopia” at the time.

(Video: Fox News)

“But when we got here in 2018, within the first year, my children were being taught about white supremacy and white privilege and that all white people were rich and racist. My son and daughter came home like, What is this,” she added.

“That’s what they’re teaching black kids: that all of this time for the past 400 years, this is what [white people have] done to you and your people. The narrative is, ‘You can’t get ahead,’” she said.

In her interview with Fox News’ Steve Doocy, Muboyayi, 44, expounded on that theme, saying that she quickly discovered after moving back to the city from Toronto that the district was “no longer teaching the history of the world, including the history of African Americans and people of the African diaspora.”

Rather, she said, curriculum now featured BLM narratives that speak of “white supremacy” and “white privilege and a number of negative things that have happened to African Americans within this country.”

However, “it doesn’t speak about when African Americans fought against white supremacy or fought against oppression,” Muboyayi, a self-employed business consultant and translator, a member of the NAACP Evanston/North Shore Branch and the Congolese Community of Chicago, continued.

The curriculum was very one-sided, the mother of two said, “a very negative side, and nothing really about the things that black people have accomplished.”

Doocy then put up a screenshot of a “teaching point” for third-grade students that says, “Today I’m going to teach you what the Black Lives Matter movement is and why it’s necessary,” before asking Muboyayi to respond.

She said she supports and teaches her kids about the concept of Black Lives Matter, “but I also believe that it leaves a lot out.”

The curriculum, she contended, attempts “to cram thousands of years of history of the people into five weeks, and within that five-week period they tend to focus mainly on atrocities.”

“Very briefly do they touch on when black people marched or attempted to fight against injustices. [The material] speaks mainly about police brutality…there is no balance,” she explained.

“Stories such as” those when blacks rose up to revolt against oppression “are not told to balance out the narrative that black people in this country have constantly been beaten down but never risen up,” Muboyayi added.

Jon Dougherty

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