‘BLM at School’ lesson plans call for ‘Week of Action’ in public schools to push toxic agenda on kids


The progressive left never rests when it comes to pushing its radical agenda, and the propaganda always starts with the education of children — Vladimir Lenin once said, “Give me four years to teach the children and the seed I have sown will never be uprooted.”

The Black Lives Matter at School movement, a self-described “national committee of educators organizing for racial justice in education,” is pushing for a week of action in an attempt to push the toxic critical race theory on children — February is Black History Month.

The movement was launched in Seattle, according to their website, and seeks to teach children about structural racism, intersectional black identities, black history, and anti-racist movements — from a decidedly left-wing point of view.

Citing a “school-to-prison-pipeline system,” the group claims the minds of the youth are being “locked up.”

“That system uses harsh discipline policies that push Black students out of schools at disproportionate rates; denies students the right to learn about their own cultures and whitewashes the curriculum to exclude many of the struggles and contributions of Black people and other people of color; and is pushing out Black teachers from the schools in cities around the country,” BLM at School alleges.

The movement broadcasts four basic “demands.”

  1. End “zero tolerance” discipline, and implement restorative justice
  2. Hire more black teachers
  3. Mandate black history and ethnic studies in K-12 curriculum
  4. Fund counselors not cops

Thirteen “Guiding Principles of BLM” are shared, which are encouraged to be part of the week of action lesson plan.

At the center of those beliefs is globalism.

“Globalism is our ability to see how we are impacted or privileged within the Black global family that exists across the world in different regions,” the website states.

Laleña Garcia, author of What We Believe: A Black Lives Matter Principles Activity Book, wrote in an essay shared, “Globalism means that we are thinking about all the different people all over the world, and thinking about the ways to keep things fair everywhere.”

There is a focus on how to talk to young children about those principles.

Creating social change through early childhood education is Garcia’s passion, as she informs on how to get “little people” to “grasp the concepts we’re introducing.”

(According to her online biography, Garcia is a kindergarten teacher at Manhattan Country School in New York.)

In effect, she coaches on how to manipulate language to make it child-friendly. One such example is seen here on how to get children to embrace restorative justice:

Restorative Justice is the commitment to build a beloved and loving community that is sustainable and growing. “We know that if you knock down someone’s block building, you have to help them rebuild it, you can’t just say, “Sorry,” and walk away. Another way to say that is restorative justice, and it’s the idea that we have to help people when something happens to them, even if it was by accident.”

 

The thirteen Black Lives Matter at School principles embrace gender dysphoria, illegal immigration, the disruption of Western nuclear family dynamics, to include building villages free from “male-centeredness.”

To get a true feel for how radical the values are, here are the 13 Principles in full:

Restorative Justice is the commitment to build a beloved and loving community that is sustainable and growing.

Empathy is one’s ability to connect with others by building relationships built on mutual trust and understanding.

Loving Engagement is the commitment to practice justice, liberation and peace.

Diversity is the celebration and acknowledgment of differences and commonalities across cultures.

Globalism is our ability to see how we are impacted or privileged within the Black global family that exists across the world in different regions.

Transgender Affirming is the commitment to continue to make space for our trans brothers and sisters by encouraging leadership and recognizing trans-antagonistic violence.

Queer Affirming is working towards a queer-affirming network where heteronormative thinking no longer exists.

Collective Value means that all Black lives, regardless of actual or perceived sexual identity, gender identity, gender expression, economic status, ability, disability, religious beliefs or disbeliefs, immigration status or location matter.

Intergenerational is a space free from ageism where we can learn from each other.

Black Families creates a space that is family friendly and free from patriarchal practices.

Black Women We build a space that affirms Black women and is free from sexism, misogyny, and environments in which men are centered.

Black Villages is the disruption of Western nuclear family dynamics and a return to the “collective village” that takes care of each other. Black Women is the building of women-centered spaces free from sexism, misogyny, and male-centeredness.

Unapologetically Black is the affirmation that Black Lives Matter and that our love, and desire for justice and freedom are prerequisites for wanting that for others. These principles are the blueprint for healing and do not include nor do they support ignoring or sanitizing the ugliness and discomfort that comes with dealing with race and anti-race issues.

 

It’s not clear how many school districts across America will be adopting a “Week of Action,” as prescribed by the group, but the website shares some schools that have been on board in the past few years.

To think of young minds being exposed to a radical agenda like this borders on child abuse.

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Tom Tillison

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