Eager-to-shame Chris Wallace shows his colors as Mulvaney defends Trump’s history

Get the latest BPR news delivered free to your inbox daily. SIGN UP HERE


CHECK OUT BizPacReview on Parler!

Fox News host Chris Wallace was practically salivating at the opportunity prod and shame former Trump chief of staff Mick Mulvaney after he resigned as US special envoy to Northern Ireland over last week’s protest at the U.S. Capitol.

Wallace took advantage of Mulvaney’s appearance to seemingly boost Democratic efforts to pursue fast-track impeachment of President Trump, who has been blamed for inciting the crowd or protesters who went too far.

 

In doing so, Wallace sold the Democrats’ first sham impeachment over the president allegedly cutting off aid to Ukraine as a serious thing.

“After all of the controversial things that Donald Trump did over the last four years, why was this week the final straw?” Wallace began the interview. “Why now say that you could no longer be part of his administration?”

 

Saying he could defend “a long litany of things that people complained about with Donald Trump,” Mulvaney said Wednesday was different.

“Wednesday was existential,” he said. “Wednesday is one of those things that struck the very heart of what it means to be an American and it was wrong and I think it was important for those of us who used to be on the inner circle … somebody who is not establishment, not a Never-Trumper to say that.”

Wallace was quick to ask, “Should President Trump be removed from office in these final ten days? If you were a member of the cabinet, would you vote to invoke the 25th Amendment? If you are still a member of Congress would you vote to impeach?”

Calling the 25th Amendment “a very clumsy tool,” Mulvaney said it’s not intended to be used for this.

“We’re talking about such an extreme event on Wednesday, it’s not surprising we are looking at extreme possible reactions to what happened on Wednesday,” he said.

As for voting on impeachment, the former Trump aide said, “I think it depends.”

“I know the Democrats are going to introduce articles of impeachment on Monday,” Mulvaney continued. “If it’s just related to Wednesday, that’s one thing. If it’s the type of impeachment that just becomes a list of complaints of why they don’t like Donald Trump, that’s something else.”

He stressed that it would be different from the first impeachment of Trump, which he called a “witch hunt.”

“It was a political thing, they were looking for an excuse to impeach the president forever,” Mulvaney explained. “Now it’s different, and I think it will be looked at very differently by members of both the house and the Senate.

Pressing, Wallace asked if he would vote for impeachment for incitement to violence, which is what he said the new article of impeachment will be.

Saying that’s the “most serious question” a member of Congress can face, Mulvaney said he would “take it really, really seriously.”

Noting that Mulvaney said he felt “embarrassment and shame” in announcing his resignation, Wallace then asked, “Do you feel any responsibility for enabling Donald Trump?”

“I feel a lot of emotions this week. I was shocked, I was angered, I was sad, I was embarrassed, I was frustrated. And I still am trying to figure out what I could have done differently,” Mulvaney said.

He said Trump “has the ability to be presidential,” but said something’s different now.

“I don’t know what’s different. If it’s different about him now, if it’s different about his advisers,” Mulvaney explained. “[Trump] used to love vigorous debate from all sides of a particular issue. I don’t know if he still has that.”

He went on to say Trump now has “people like Rudy Giuliani and Peter Navarro that simply tell him what he wants to hear and reaffirm exactly what they think he wants them to say.”

Wallace would present the argument that this is who Trump is, citing Gen. John Kelly, who serves as the president’s chief of staff.

Powered by Topple

Tom Tillison

Comments

Latest Articles