‘I made a mistake’: Sarah Palin calls on Americans to ‘speak out’ in support of Julian Assange pardon

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Amid plenty of rumblings about a possible pardon for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, count former Alaska governor Sarah Palin among those advocating in his favor.

In a video shared online, Palin admits that her previous opposition to Assange was misplaced and that he “deserves a pardon.”

 

“Hey this is Sarah Palin up in Alaska and I am the first one to admit when I make a mistake,” she said. “I made a mistake some years ago, not supporting Julian Assange — thinking that he was a bad guy, that he leaked material that perhaps he shouldn’t — and I’ve learned a lot since then.”

WikiLeaks published emails from Palin obtained when her email account was hacked during the 2008 presidential election, after she was tapped by the late Sen. John McCain to be his vice presidential running mate.

This being the tip of the iceberg to the disgraceful reception she received from the  Democratic Party, their corrupt media allies and some alleged Republicans — people like MSNBC host Nicole Wallace, a GOP handler assigned to Palin who fed her to the wolves.

“I think Julian did the right thing, and Julian did us all a favor in America, did the world a favor by fighting for what he believed was right — and ultimately he’s been proven to be right,” Palin continued. “He deserves a pardon. He deserves all of us to understand more about what he has done in the name of real journalism, and that’s getting to the bottom of issues that the public really needs to hear about and benefit from.”

Stressing that she has “learned a lot,” Palin reiterated that she made a mistake and called on people to “speak out” on Assange’s behalf.

“I know it’s coming down to the wire on whether he’s going to be pardoned or not,” she explained. “I want more Americans to speak out on his behalf and to understand what it is that he has done — and what has been done to him.”

“[Assange] was working on the people’s behalf to allow information to get to us so that we could make up our minds about different issues, about different people. He did the right thing,” Palin concluded. “I support him, and I hope that more and more people, especially as it comes down to the wire, will speak up in support of pardoning Julian.”

There was lots of online speculation and faulty reports last week that President Trump will pardon Assange.

So much so that Edward Snowden was prompted to respond to a now deleted tweet from Pastor Mark Burns saying the Assange pardon will happen.

“I very much hope this is true,” Snowden replied. “The case against Assange is based on a legal theory that would criminalize the work of every journalist, both at home and abroad.”

Australian MP George Christensen urged Trump to “poke the deep state in the eye” with a pardon for Assange, who sits in London’s Belmarsh prison awaiting a decision on his extradition case.

Christensen said it’s “the right thing to do.”

“Julian Assange has been a target of the Democrats actually,” the politician told Sky News Australia. “Hillary Clinton hates his guts, obviously for exposing who the real Hillary was.”

Tom Tillison

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