Problem-solver Kirstie Alley has BEST solution for political leaders imposing COVID lockdowns

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Actress Kirstie Alley took to social media Friday morning to convey an idea for elected political leaders contemplating or imposing new COVID restrictions on business owners: Live by the same financial rules.

“My solution. All senators congressmen governors and city political officials from any state or city who impose shut downs to the extent that businesses and people have no form of income, take no salaries for the duration of the shutdown. Leadership leads by example & from the top,” Alley, who starred in the hit sitcom “Cheers” as well as several films, wrote on Twitter.

Several other users expressed their approval.

“I endorse this idea. If people can’t work to make a paycheck, no one should receive a paycheck and let’s how they like them apples,” Ned Ryan, CEO of conservative activist group American Majority wrote in response.

“Don’t forget to include their staff, a large majority of elected officials could afford not getting a check but the pressure of losing their staff would make them act. If not who would carry their bags, make their dinner reservations, etc.,” another user wrote.

https://twitter.com/southphillyi/status/1334870136277360640

Warning: Strong language

Alley’s suggestion comes as states and cities around the country reintroduce or expand coronavirus-related business closures and other restrictions at a time when many of them are teetering on bankruptcy as it is.

In May, at the pinnacle of shutdowns around the country, more than 100,000 businesses had already shuttered permanently, the Washington Post reported, citing a study by researchers at the University of Illinois, Harvard Business School, Harvard University and the University of Chicago.

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At the time, that was about 2 percent of businesses in the country, but the restaurant industry had been hit the worst. Of the closures, 3 percent were eateries.

Congress passed and President Donald Trump signed a pair of coronavirus stimulus packages by May, money which was primarily directed at individuals and small businesses.

But, the Post reported at the time, just 4.2 million of an estimated 30 million small businesses had gotten financial relief.

“We are going to see a level of bankruptcy activity that nobody in business has seen in their lifetime,” James Hammond, chief executive of New Generation Research, a firm that tracks bankruptcy trends, predicted. “This will hit everyone, but it will be harder for small businesses since they don’t have a lot of spare cash.”

Also in May, a survey by the Human Resource Management found that 52 percent of small business owners expected to shutter over the next six months due to the economic fallout from mandatory coronavirus lockdowns.

“SHRM has tracked Covid-19’s impact on work, workers, and the workplace for months, but these might be the most alarming findings to date,” said CEO, Johnny C. Taylor, Jr., in a statement.

“Small business is truly the backbone of our economy, so when half say they’re worried about being wiped out, let’s remember: We’re talking about roughly 14 million businesses.”

A weak November jobs report also reflects more economic pain coming for American workers and, unquestionably, small businesses.

“Over the summer, many of these businesses gave it a go on their own – as the warm weather delivered consumer optimism and the regions hardest hit by the virus in the spring emerged from their lockdowns,” writes Daniel Alpert, a senior fellow in financial macroeconomics, an adjunct professor of law at Cornell Law School, and a founding managing partner of Westwood Capital, LLC.

“Now we are seeing restaurants, hotels, and amusement businesses around the nation, the source of 16.7 million jobs a year ago, fall under renewed pressure and many of them are not going to make it.”

Jon Dougherty

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