‘Removed’ Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale tells story, blames ‘D-level’ ‘talking heads’

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Former Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale accused “D-level people” and “talking heads” of being responsible for his dismissal earlier this year, adding he believes that he and the president’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, made a strong team.

“We had a plan. I always had a lot of confidence in our plan,” he told Fox News’ Martha MacCallum Tuesday. “And I think the president and Jared had a lot of confidence in the plan. And it was unfortunate that we diverged from the plan right as we came down the stretch.”

Asked about his departure over the summer, however, Parscale was adamant.

“I was removed,” he said, suggesting it came as a shock to him.

“I didn’t get a warning sign really that — no one asked me to change my plan. No one asked me to do anything different. I don’t know exactly why I was removed and why, all of the sudden, we had to challenge the plan,” said Parscale.

He also said he believes that in 2016, Kushner “was the real campaign manager,” and that he was “semi-quasi-campaign manager,” but that he could never say as much publicly.

“Jared was the real campaign manager. I was the one doing the day-to-day. And we won. And it really didn’t make sense to me why, in ’20, they had to change away from that,” he said.

“I think it’s all the D-level people, all the talking heads that are around the president that had never done anything in their life, never created a business, never built anything successful, but talked themselves into something,” he added.

“And I think, when the polling numbers were going down, they were in his ear, and I was out working.”

Parscale also said that President Trump was well on the road to a massive 400-plus electoral vote victory before the COVID-19 pandemic hit, though he said the president wound up doing well anyway.

However, there was a low point — he estimates around April — when polling for the president was tanking versus the likely Democrat nominee Joe Biden, with some advisers blaming his often combative coronavirus press conferences.

Reports then claimed that Trump had a shouting match with Parscale over the phone regarding the declining polling numbers, but that Parscale patched things with the president a short while later.

Parscale explained that incident to MacCallum.

“I didn’t like lying to him — I like telling the truth. Sometimes that comes with a lot of painful days, knowing that I might let him down or make him upset, but a lot of the D-level people that hung around him told him what he wanted to hear: They were ‘yes’ men. I wasn’t going to be ‘yes’ man, but a ‘get it done’ man,” he said.

“And I did it for him. I did it for the family. I did it for this country because I feel like somebody needed to be the one telling him the truth. And I think Jared did too.”

Regarding the COVID pandemic, Parscale said he believes the president made a policy error when he pushed to reopen the economy sooner instead of showing “empathy” for Americans stricken with the virus.

“I think that goes to one thing. I think it was a decision on COVID to go for opening the economy versus public empathy,” he said, calling it a “policy error” that cost Trump with suburban voters.

“And I think a young family with a young child who were scared to take them back to school wanted to see an empathetic president and empathetic Republican Party. And I think that — and I said this multiple times — he chose a different path,” he added.

“I think he got one choice away from being perfect,” Parscale added, “and that was, do I want to open the country and be the economy, or do I want to publicly empathetic?”

Parscale also said he and the campaign team said down in early 2019 and discussed a strategy to counter the likelihood of “rampant” voter fraud.

“In April of 2019, I sat down with my team, and I said, let’s come up with the biggest Election Day operation ever, because voter fraud is going to be rampant,” he said.

“If it’s not going to be rampant, everyone’s going to think it’s rampant. Or they’re going to game it. Something’s going to happen, because we sat around for two years in 2017, 2018, when they talked all this stuff about all this voter rant,” he added. “I said, if we win again, they’re going to do the same thing.

“So, let’s make sure we’re there. And let’s make sure they don’t try to steal it from us, make sure — they’re so scared of four more years,” Parscale said, adding that his plan was to work with the Republican National Committee to have lawyers file lawsuits overturning changes to election rules made in battleground states, such as universal mail-in ballots.

“What that meant was to have lawyers everywhere, file suits beforehand, protect beforehand. And somehow, between July of 2020 and Election Day, that fell apart. And that’s a question. I don’t know exactly what the answer is. But, from everything I’m hearing, it did not occur,” he said.

And that, he said, is “a travesty to President Trump. It’s a travesty to this republic.”

Jon Dougherty

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