Be damned the voters? Former FBI official suggests ‘bipartisan commission’ vet future presidential candidates

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American voters were once again dismissed as an unimportant part of the election process as an MSNBC guest suggested future presidents be vetted by a “bipartisan commission.”

Frank Figliuzzi, a former assistant director for counterintelligence at the FBI, declared that the country “got it wrong” by electing President Donald Trump in 2016 and he would like to see future presidential candidates go through a process to try and avoid it happening again.

Figliuzzi spoke with MSNBC’s Stephanie Ruhle about the New York Times report on Trump’s tax returns, discussing how the president allegedly has around $400 million in personal debt because of his many businesses before being elected.

“Frank, the president was a businessman for years and years. A lot of big business guys run a lot of debt. Why wouldn’t he just come clean and say, ‘Yep, these are my creditors.’ You say because we don’t know this information, it makes him the most vulnerable president in our history,” Ruhle asked on Thursday.


(Source: MSNBC)

“He is the most vulnerable president in our history in terms of compromise and potential exposure to those who want to help him dig out of his financial pit in return for a price,” Figliuzzi claimed.

“And that’s, I think, where the national security problem comes in. That price, that they would ask for, is that he makes decisions in their best interest, not in our best interest,” he added.

“There’s also another layer to this, which is that when you’re this entangled with Russia and the former Soviet bloc you’re going to run smack into organized crime figures. In fact in my work in counterintelligence and the FBI we often couldn’t tell the difference between ex-Russian intelligence officers and current Russian organized crime figures,” Figliuzzi, who was the head of the FBI’s counterintelligence unit under former FBI Director Robert Mueller, told Ruhle.

He claimed there were “too many questions” and “too many gaps in the tax returns.”

“Why is this president paying more to foreign nations in taxes than he is to the United States. How does he cover his debt? Who is doing that for him? What’s the Deutsche Bank connection? Why are there so many golf courses losing so much money? And why the continued purchase of those properties?” Figliuzzi asked.

The New York Times claimed it had secured decades worth of Trump’s tax returns which allegedly showed “chronic losses and years of tax avoidance.” The newspaper also said that Trump had paid no taxes at all in 10 of the previous 15 years “largely because he reported losing much more money than he made.”

The president slammed the Times on Sunday, calling the report, “made up” and “totally fake news” while Democrats and the liberal media were up in arms about what the numbers purportedly revealed.

Figliuzzi’s claims about Trump’s businesses and his income taxes led him to a radical conclusion.

“We’ve got to have a national discussion about how we vet a presidential candidate,” he told Ruhle.

“We screwed this up. Whether it’s the media not digging deeply enough, whether it’s a time to have a discussion about a bipartisan committee that demands tax returns, make that a requirement or exposes financial pictures for candidates, but we — we got this wrong, and this can’t happen again,” he declared, dismissing the votes of millions of Americans who chose Trump to lead the nation.

“If he’s vulnerable, that means we’re vulnerable,” Ruhle responded.

Reacting to a video clip of the segment posted on Twitter, Rebeccah Heinrichs, a Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute, tweeted: “Here’s the thing about democracy- the people decide.”

“The disdain for the everyday American, and the elitism is somethin,” she added.

Other Twitter users heartily agreed.

 

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Frieda Powers

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