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Road-blocking ‘activists’ terrorize more motorists; some states allow victims to fight back

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Black Lives Matter activists are blocking roads and threatening the lives of motorists in the nation’s capital and other cities.

The scenes of blocked cars amid mobs of protesters have been shared on social media amid concerns that it’s “only a matter of time” before the powder keg of tensions turns deadly. Actor James Woods shared a video of one such incident purportedly in Washington, D.C. where a driver was being harassed, and noted that drivers may be able to defend themselves with “deadly force” if necessary thanks to the “castle doctrine” in several states.

“Castle doctrine in many states gives the occupants of an automobile the same rights as a home owner. If your life is threatened, you may defend your life with deadly force,” Woods tweeted along with a video that had been posted by journalist Ian Miles Cheong.

Castle doctrines are self-defense laws which can be found in about two dozen states and can vary by location. The District of Columbia is not listed as one of the nation’s locations to have a “castle doctrine” which protects a person from prosecution under certain circumstances if threatened at home or in a vehicle and sometimes a place of work.

The video shared by Woods showed a driver being taunted and threatened by activists who stood blocking the road. Several other cars could be seen and heard honking their horns behind the vehicle which was stopped in front of a wall of protesters screaming at him to leave the road that he had every right to be on.

“No justice, no peace,” one man repeatedly said after approaching the driver’s partially opened window.

“He’s scared as f—,” added the man who was filming the encounter.

“You gotta go home and I don’t give a f—!” one woman off camera screamed and was soon joined by a cacophony of other shouting women.

Meanwhile, the other man kept his arm against the vehicle door, continuing to taunt the driver and laughing that his “gas is burning.”

The person filming then suggested the driver join the protest, telling him he would not be able to break through the human barrier.

“Hey bro, hop out with us! Hop out with us!” he said as the driver could be heard saying, “no, I can’t.”

“If you hopped out, you’d have a better chance,” he said, noting that the frustrated driver looked like he was about to cry.

The sight has become a familiar one as so-called protesters take their demonstrations to roadways and highways, risking their own lives and those of drivers. Earlier this month, a video showed a driver getting out of his pickup truck to confront a group of mostly white protesters who had blocked a highway in Austin, Texas.

“Hey look, I understand the cause, I appreciate it — but I gotta go to work!” he said. “I’m black — I gotta go to work! I got bills. I got kids. Get the f–k out my way!”

Many social media comments on James Woods’ tweet about the “castle doctrine” agreed that tensions will ultimately erupt over the blocked roads.

 

 

Frieda Powers

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