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Protesters build guillotine outside $200 billion man Jeff Bezos’ home, demand $30 minimum wage

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Winston Churchill once reportedly said, “Each one hopes that if he feeds the crocodile enough, the crocodile will eat him last. All of them hope that the storm will pass before their turn comes to be devoured.”

The quote comes from a Jan 20, 1940 speech Churchill, then First Lord of the British Admiralty, as he discussed European countries that were attempting to remain neutral as Adolph Hitler’s Nazi Germany attacked and conquered one after another.

It could just as easily apply to the Marxist Left which is rising in America.

As Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’ wealth reached $200 billion this week, protesters built a mock guillotine in front of his Washington, D.C., residence as they and some Amazon workers demanded a $30-per-hour minimum wage, the Washington Examiner reported.

Led by former Amazon employee Christian Smalls, who has protested against Bezos before, the latest demonstration attracted about 100 people.

“Give a good reason why we don’t deserve a $30 minimum wage when this man makes $4,000 a second,” Smalls said.

It wasn’t clear if Bezos was home at the time of the protest.

In a lecture to the small crowd, Smalls talked about his employment at the e-tailer behemoth, claiming that the company hadn’t responded quickly enough to the COVID-19 pandemic.

He claimed that he worked long hours for inadequate pay, presumably after knowing what his wages would be before accepting the job. Smalls also said other workers came in for their shifts infected with the virus.

He walked off his job at a shipping center in Staten Island in March; the company fired him not long after, claiming he violated quarantine and other safety measures.

“Hey, Jeff Bezos. I’m going to let you know something today: We are just getting started,” Smalls said during his protest. “We’re going to go to every single location you’ve got across the country and set up shop until you meet our demands as workers.”

Guillotines are most notable for their use during the French Revolution to behead nobility and the elite.

As for Amazon and Bezos, it’s not as though the company and its founder have not been providing a valuable service to Americans.

Amazon’s revenues jumped substantially in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic as customers flooded the company with orders after local shops and stores were ordered closed to stop the virus’ spread.

Even now, as states and cities begin to reopen, scores of Americans have no doubt grown more accustomed to shopping online, as evidenced by Amazon’s continued sales volume.

The e-tailer’s sales leaped skyward by 40 percent year-over-year in the second quarter as Amazon raked in $88.9 billion, Fortune reported late last month.

What’s more, the company beat expectations.

“Amazon’s profits also doubled year-over-year to $5.2 billion in its latest quarter, which is notable considering the company said in April that it was projecting a loss of up to $1.5 billion in its second quarter due to the high costs associated with operating during the coronavirus pandemic,” Fortune noted further.

In May, the company announced it would spend its entire second-quarter profit dealing with coronavirus. In addition to providing more personal protective equipment and employee testing, workers were also given pay raises to deal with the increased volume.

Bezos also owns the Washington Post and space exploration company Blue Origin.

That said, the construction of the mock guillotine appears to symbolize that regardless of what Bezos does for his workers, it may never be enough, especially if he continues to amass wealth.

Jon Dougherty

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