Obama uses John Lewis funeral for divisive attack, pushes mail-in vote to packed house ‘so people don’t get sick’

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Barack Obama was back where he loves to be in delivering the eulogy at Congressman John Lewis’s funeral, which is standing on a national platform lecturing the nation.

As smug and arrogant as ever, with seemingly added anger, the former president exploited the occasion to condemn “attacks on democracy” and speak on the myth of voter suppression in furtherance of the identity politics keeping the Democratic Party alive today.

While unable to summon the courage to specifically name President Donald Trump and the Republican Party, there was no mistaking Obama’s target.

“Even as we sit here, there are those in power who are doing their darnedest to discourage people from voting by closing polling locations, by targeting minorities and students with restrictive ID laws, and attacking our voting rights with surgical precision, even undermining the Postal Service in the run-up to an election that’s going to be dependent on mail-in ballots so people don’t get sick,” he proclaimed.

The line about people not getting sick coming as mourners sat shoulder to shoulder in packed pews at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

As conservative Matt Walsh observed, there seems to be two standards in America:

Obama said Election Day should be made a national holiday and called for automatic voter registration, to include felons, who he said: “earned their second chance.” He even talked about doing away with the filibuster in the U.S. Senate.

Those in attendance seemed to lose sight of the fact that they were at a funeral and not a political rally, as they cheered Obama on, even giving him a standing ovation.

That this lecture came on the same day that President Trump posted a controversial tweet about delaying the election is no coincidence — the president raised the issue as a tactic to counter Democrats’ persistence in pursuing nationwide voting by mail, which would entail mailing out well over 100 million blank ballots.

In 2018, there were over 153 million people registered to vote in the U.S., meaning the scale for voter fraud is off the chart. Trump called attention to a CBS News experiment this week about a simulated vote-by-mail process that exposed flaws in the system.

The doggedness with which Democrats pursue this tactic, as seen with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks volumes to how they see voting by mail as perhaps the only way to defeat Trump in November.

He also advocated, from the pulpit, for Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico — two Democratic strongholds – to have equal representation in government, which would assure the party four more Senate seats, above all else.

But Obama’s greatest sin Thursday in Atlanta was one of his original sins, preaching a racially divisive message at a time when racial strife is tearing at the very fabric of our society.

Recalling controversial figures like Bull Conner and George Wallace, names from over a half-century ago, Obama defended the violent rioting in our streets by echoing the left’s prescribed narrative that they are “peaceful protesters” as he besmirched law enforcement as a whole.

“Bull Connor may be gone. But today we witness with our own eyes police officers kneeling on the necks of Black Americans. George Wallace may be gone. But we can witness our federal government sending agents to use tear gas and batons against peaceful demonstrators,” he said.

This being a reference to the same protesters in Lafayette Square who tried to burn down the historic St. John’s Episcopal Church. Located next to the White House, the house of worship is known as the church of presidents.

Here’s a sample of responses to the divisiveness on display Thursday by the former president from Twitter:

Tom Tillison

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

The longest-tenured writer at BizPac Review, Tom grew up in Maryland before moving to Central Florida as a young teen. It is in the Sunshine State that he honed both his passion for politics and his writing skills.
Tom Tillison

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