Trump refutes ‘absurd’ allegations that start to drip from niece’s tell-all book; denies cheating on SATs

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The New York Times obtained a copy of disgruntled family member Mary Trump’s tell-all book ahead of next week’s expected release — to the surprise of no one — and reported that it claims President Trump paid someone to take the SAT for him.

The book, “Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man,” set to be published next week, and includes a passage that claimed that Trump hired a proxy to take the test for him — the niece claim cheating was “a way of life” for the president.

“The high score the proxy earned for him, Ms. Trump adds, helped the young Mr. Trump to later gain admittance as an undergraduate to the University of Pennsylvania’s prestigious Wharton business school,” The Times reported.

“The absurd SAT allegation is completely false,” Deputy White House Press Secretary Sarah Matthews said in a statement.

“The president describes the relationship he had with his father as warm and said his father was very good to him,” Matthews said, in response to Mary Trump’s claim that Fred Trump Sr. was abusive.

“He said his father was loving and not at all hard on him as a child,” she added.

Matthews also noted that Trump has been in office for over three years, asking why the niece, who blames Trump for her father’s death, is only now speaking out.

Trump’s sister, Maryanne Trump Barry, a retired federal appeals court judge, is generously featured in the book, including a passage about her deep reservations about his fitness for office, according to the Times.

“He’s a clown — this will never happen,” Mary Trump quotes her aunt as saying in 2015, right after Trump announced his presidential bid.

Naturally, there’s allegations of sexual misconduct, with the niece claiming Uncle Donald ogled her as a 29-year-old in a swimsuit at Mar-a-Lago.

“Holy s**t, Mary, you’re stacked!” Trump allegedly said, according to Mary Trump.

White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany was asked about the book Tuesday by a reporter.

“It’s a book of falsehoods and that’s about it,” McEnany said, adding, “It’s ridiculous, absurd allegations that have absolutely no bearing in truth.”

Long estranged from the family, Mary and her brother, Fred the 3rd, contested their grandfather’s will after Fred Trump Sr., passed away in 1999.

The siblings alleged that the will had been “procured by fraud and undue influence” by Trump and his siblings, resulting in a substantially smaller share for the heirs of Fred Trump Jr, who died in 1981.

The president’s younger brother, Robert Trump, turned to the courts to stop his niece from publishing the family tell-all, citing a nondisclosure settlement agreement she had signed.

A New York judge recently ordered a temporary halt on the book’s release, but the publisher, Simon & Schuster, said it already shipped thousands of copies of the book, part of an initial 75,000 copy run.

Simon & Schuster reportedly claimed that it was unaware Mary Trump had signed a nondisclosure agreement that would hinder the publication of her book. Either way, a New York appeals judge reversed the decision to stop the book’s release last week.

According to Simon & Schuster, the book  “shines a bright light on the dark history of their family in order to explain how her uncle became the man who now threatens the world’s health, economic security, and social fabric.”

“She describes a nightmare of traumas, destructive relationships, and a tragic combination of neglect and abuse,” the description reads. “She explains how specific events and general family patterns created the damaged man who currently occupies the Oval Office, including the strange and harmful relationship between Fred Trump and his two oldest sons, Fred Jr., and Donald.”

Tom Tillison

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