Chick-fil-A CEO Dan Cathy advises whites to express their ‘shame’ over racism by shining a black person’s shoes

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Chick-fil-A CEO Dan Cathy clearly did not get the memo about capitulating to the insatiable rage mob on the left. Either that or Cathy has cooked up a serious case of white guilt.

Attending a church service at Atlanta’s Passion City Church on Sunday, Cathy took part in “an open and honest conversation” on racism.

His solution to help white people express their “shame” over racism was to suggest that they shine the shoes of black people.

Words that he put into action when he walked across the stage, knelt down and began shining the shoes of black Christian rapper Lecrae.

“We need to find somebody that needs to have their shoes shined. We need to just go right on over and shine their shoes, whether they got tennis shoes on or not, maybe they got sandals on, it really doesn’t matter,” he said, as he bowed down and cleaned the rapper’s sneakers.

“But there’s a time in which we need to have some personal action here, maybe we need to give him a hug too,” Cathy added, as he hugged Lecrae.

Fittingly, Lecrae countered by joking, “And some stock in Chick-fil-A.”

With a net worth of more than $7 billion, such political theater comes easy for Cathy, but the rapper unintentionally exposed what the left truly wants — reparations, as in cold hard cash.

The CEO said he’d previously “bought about 1,500” shoeshine brushes to distribute throughout the company.

“I gave them to all our Chick-Fil-A operators and staff a number of years ago,” Cathy explained. “So any expressions of a contrite heart, of a sense of humility, a sense of shame, a sense of embarrassment begat with an apologetic heart — I think that’s what our world needs to hear today.”

He set up his money scene by talking about a moving incident at a Texas revival that he had heard about.

“At that revival in the front seat was an older African American man that was sitting there,” Cathy recalled. “And this young man got up, and he was so gripped with conviction about the racism that was in that local community that he took a shoe brush and he walked over to this elderly gentleman and he knelt on his knees and he began to shine his shoes.”

At Sunday’s service, Cathy also urged white people not to “point fingers” at looters.

“[We had] about a dozen Chick-fil-A restaurants vandalized in the last week, but my plea would be for the white people, rather than point fingers at that kind of criminal effort, would be to see the level of frustration and exasperation and almost the sense of hopelessness that exists on some of those activists within the African-American community,” he said.

Interestingly, since America stood with Chick-fil-A, after the fast-food chain was unfairly targeted by the LGBTQ community because of the religious beliefs of Cathy’s father, he seems to be doing his damnedest to spoil the goodwill built up.

A recent example of this was seen in November, when Chick-fil-A announced that it was narrowing the number of charities the company will support and was dropping two Christian organizations previously supported, which had been tagged anti-LGBT by the left.

The organizations are the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and The Salvation Army, which have been accused of harboring anti-LGBT views for their Christian beliefs.

In the end, a social media user nailed it with this tweet: “Wow. Chick-Fil-A has somehow managed to discover how to piss off almost everyone no matter what they believe. That’s a real talent!”

Here’s a sampling of other responses from Twitter:

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Tom Tillison

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