Dr. Fauci dismisses MIT report on social distancing as ‘terribly misleading’

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, dismissed a new MIT study by researcher Lydia Bourouiba that claims the 6-foot social distancing rule is inadequate, prompting concerns that the distance should be extended to 27 feet.

Fox News’ John Roberts asked Dr. Fauci whether “current social distancing guidelines” should need to be revised in light of this new information.

“There is a professor from MIT who suggests that coronavirus can be carried on droplets a distance of 27 feet,” Roberts said. “Do you buy into that, and if that might be the case, does that suggest that current distancing guidelines may need to be extended?”

Fauci admits that the study “disturbed” him, but only because it “could really be terribly misleading.”

“This could really be terribly misleading. What it was, was looking at the distance that droplets fly by speaking, by coughing, by sneezing,” he explained.

“So if you go way back and go ‘ACHOO!’ and go like that,” Fauci gestured, “then you might get 27 feet. So when you see somebody do that, get out of the way. But that’s not practical.”

(Source: C-Span)

Dr. Fauci added: “I was disturbed by that report because that was misleading. That means that all of a sudden, the 6-foot thing doesn’t work. That is a very, very robust, vigorous, achoo sneeze. That’s what that is, and that’s not what we’re talking about.”

Fauci then sneezed in an exaggerated manner.

Lydia Bourouiba is an associate professor at MIT who warns that “pathogen-bearing droplets of all sizes can travel 23 to 27 feet” in a report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association

She wrote: “A 2020 report from China demonstrated that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 virus particles could be found in the ventilation systems in hospital rooms of patients with COVID-19.”

However, Bourouiba conceded: “Whether these data have clinical implications with respect to COVID-19 is unknown.”

Bourouiba warned that droplets from COVID-19 can contaminate surfaces or remain suspended in the air for hours after someone sneezes or coughs, for example.

These findings confirm a recent study by the National Institutes of Health showing the COVID-19 virus is stable for several hours to days in aerosols and on surfaces. Basically, this suggests that you can get the virus through the air and after touching contaminated objects.

Dr. David Price of the Weill Cornell Medical Center said the best way to prevent getting the coronavirus is to avoid touching your face. This is the No. 1 way to contract the virus, he warned.

“I work at probably the premier hospital in New York City. Our hospital is almost exclusively a COVID-19 hospital, but we’re learning and we know a lot,” Dr. Price said. “I am confident that the stuff I can tell you should make you guys feel like you don’t have to be scared and that you can protect your family.”


(Source: Watters World)

Dr. Price explained: “The ways that you get this is the transmission of the virus almost exclusively from your hands to your face, from your hands to your face and inside your eyes, into your nose or into your mouth. The overwhelming majority of people are getting this by physically touching someone who has this disease or will develop it in the next one to two days and then touching their face.”

As with everything, it’s up to us to be skeptical of the media and even the scientific community because they’re not omniscient and have been proven wrong before.

Remember this?

‘Dr. Doom’ Anthony Fauci warns we may never return to normal life after COVID-19

Comments

Latest Articles