Red wine pumps from Italian town’s water pipes into homes for 3 hours due to malfunction

Residents in a village in northern Italy faced a malfunction in their plumbing that many probably wished was not fixed too quickly.

The Italian town of Castelvetro has been dealing with the somber coronavirus crisis but, for a few hours on Wednesday, residents were surprised with a strange treat as red wine began to flow from their water faucets and shower heads.


(Source: The Telegraph)

A local winery reportedly suffered a malfunction in its bottling line that sent 1,000 liters of sparkling wine into the town’s water pipes instead of into ready to fill bottles, according to CNN.

About 20 homes experienced a few unexpected hours of the strange sight as red Lambrusco freely poured out of kitchen sinks.

According to Giorgia Mezzacqui, deputy mayor of Castelvetro, the malfunction, which the local government said didn’t pose any health risks, lasted about three hours.

A faulty valve in the washing circuit at the Cantina Settecani winery was behind the glitch which sent Lambrusco Grasparossa out of the building and into private homes in the town which is about 10 miles south of Modena. The pressure caused the wine, which is a local specialty, to seep through the town’s water lines, according to the winery.

Mezzacqui noted that the town, which attracts international food and wine enthusiasts, has suffered economically from the coronavirus outbreak. Cancellations have affected about 80 percent of Castelvetro’s tourism structures, she shared.

Castelvetro and other small towns like it in Italy are “the engine propelling an extraordinary nation,” she told CNN. “But now we need everybody’s help to survive.”

Italy is reportedly Europe’s worst hit-country, according to the latest BBC report which noted that the death toll has risen to 197 as of Saturday, with 49 deaths in 24 hours being reported by officials.

The grim outlook was momentarily forgotten in Castelvetro, however, as the free-flowing wine lent residents some humor-filled respite.

The glitch “was appreciated by many,” Fabrizio Amorotti, the commercial manager at Cantina Settecani, told CNN. “Some clients in the areas called us to warn us about it, and to share they were bottling the wine!”

The deputy mayor was grateful for the temporary distraction.

“At a time where we have very little to smile about, I’m glad we brought some levity to others,” Mezzacqui told CNN. “Hopefully someday they’ll remember us and will want to come visit us.”

The news prompted plenty of appreciative reactions on Twitter.

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Frieda Powers

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