Booker shoots for Spartacus drama on Senate floor, ends up framing Americans as racist bigots

Screengrab CSPAN

With the U.S. Senate expected to acquit President Donald Trump on Wednesday on the articles of impeachment filed by House Democrats, likely in a bipartisan manner, all Democrats have left in their failed impeachment strategy are a few floor speeches.

As Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., took his turn, the lawmaker desperately tried to summon a little emotion, coming up just short. Booker called for unity and then proved that he exists in an elitist bubble by denouncing the country as racist bigots.

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“This is a sad day,” Booker pontificated. “This is a sad moment in the history of this body and in our nation, and I fear that it is emblematic, that it is a symptom of deeper challenges to this nation, challenges that are being exploited by our enemies abroad and by opportunists here at home.”

He warned “factionalism that our founders warned us of has deepened beyond mere partisanship, to a self-destructive tribalism,” quoting George Washington. “Many in our society now hate other Americans not because of the content of their character or their virtue and values that they hold dear, but we as Americans now more and more see hate proliferating in our country between fellow Americans because of what party we belong to.”

 

This is coming from a party that thrives on divisive politics, and just impeached a duly elected president strictly along party lines — Booker described impeachment as “a patriotic moment. It’s about putting principle above party.”

“We have failed to listen to the words that come out of each other’s mouth, failed to listen to the ideals or the principles or the underlying facts because we now simply listen to partisanship,” Booker said.

The speech had a distinct tone of knowing a partisan attempt to take out a sitting president has failed and Booker, aka Spartacus, is trying to inject into the record that he came down on the side of unity.

“And so, yes, today is a sad moment, but we as a nation have never been defined by our darkest hours,” he said. “We have always been defined by how we respond to our challenges, how we have refused to surrender to cynicism. How we’ve refused to give in to despair. And so, I fear … mere words in this time are impotent and ineffective. It may mark where we as individuals stand for the record, but the challenge demands more from all of us in this time.”

Booker would go on to say he loves our nation’s history, but for all the talk of unity, he would later denounce “the low actions from our leaders most high.”

In effect, calling America a racist, bigoted country, declaring that “the true test of our democracy will not turn alone on the actions of this body.”

“Because presidents before and this body before has failed us in dark times,” Booker said, speaking of Congress. “They’ve failed the ideals of freedom when time and time again they defended slavery. This body has failed the ideals of liberty when time and time again it rejected civil rights. This body has failed the ideals in the past of equality when it voted down, again and again, suffrage for women.”

Tom Tillison

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