Four prosecutors who won elections in VA all share common connection with George Soros

(Obama State Department Flickr)

Four of the Democrats elected to office in the now thoroughly blue state of Virginia this week won their elections in part because of help from notorious left-wing billionaire George Soros.

The four officials are soon-to-be:

  • Loudoun Commonwealth’s Attorney Buta Biberaj
  • Fairfax County Commonwealth’s Attorney Steve Descano
  • Albemarle County Commonwealth’s Attorney Jim Hingeley
  • Arlington County Commonwealth’s Attorney Parisa Dehghani-Tafti

“The outcomes were powered to a significant degree by Democratic mega-donor George Soros, whose political action committee spent nearly $2.1 million in the primary and general election on polls, mailers and advertisements,” The Washington Post openly admitted on Tuesday.

The Post, a left-wing paper, conceded that Soros’ involvement was “unprecedented.”

The spending was unprecedented in prosecutors’ races in Virginia, part of an effort by Soros to tip prosecutors’ offices to progressive candidates across the country,” its report continued. “It was also controversial, since opponents accused the recipients of being in the pocket of a billionaire with limited connections to Virginia.”

Financial records reviewed by the Washington Free Beacon show that Biberaj received $850,000 directly from Soros via his D.C.-based Justice and Public Safety PAC and an additional $18,000 indirectly from Soros via the New Virginia Majority, an advocacy group funded by his Justice and Public Safety PAC.

Descano and Hingeley meanwhile reportedly benefited from $600,000 and $5,000 in donations, respectively, from Soros’ PAC.

The Beacon’s report did not include any information on Dehghani-Tafti. Conversely, the Post’s report did not mention Hingeley. The reason for this omitted information remains unclear.

The Post did however note the election of a fifth prosecutor, soon-to-be Prince William County Commonwealth’s Attorney Amy Ashworth, though it claimed she “did not receive in-kind contributions from Soros.” It’s not clear whether she benefited from any indirect contributions.

What’s known is that even some non-“Progressive” Democrats have not taken kindly to Soros’ direct and indirect influence, particularly since he lives in New York.

“We were outspent 3 to 1 … This is an election that was bought, not won,” Ben Tribbett, a campaign consultant for incumbent Fairfax County Commonwealth’s Attorney Raymond Morrogh, a Democrat, told the Post.

“I think it is foreboding for local elections because we’re going to have people clamoring to get money from George Soros — that’s what I fear greatly,” Karen Darner, a former state delegate who backed incumbent Arlington County Commonwealth’s Attorney Theo Stamos, also a Democrat, added.

What happened in Virginia is in fact endemic of a growing trend.

“In recent years, the billionaire has funded district attorney and prosecutor races in several states including California, Florida, Illinois, Mississippi, Louisiana, Pennsylvania, Texas, New York, and New Mexico,” the Beacon noted.

It’s not clear why members of the “Progressive” far-left — who always complain about “money in politics” and “outside influence” — have no qualms about Soros’ behavior. It’s almost as if they think “money” and “influence” are totally acceptable so long as said money and influence are given to THEIR preferred candidates.

Regarding the situation in Virginia, Soros’ interest in the newly elected prosecutors is reportedly linked to their desire to radically transform (not reform) America’s criminal justice system.

“The candidates promised sweeping changes such as moving away from the death penalty, dropping prosecutions for marijuana possession, ending cash bail and limiting cooperation with immigration authorities,” the Post reported.

While President Donald Trump also supports criminal justice reform, his vision certainly doesn’t include eliminating the death penalty and allowing local authorities to ignore America’s federal immigration laws.

Nor has the president ever suggested that the punishment for theft should be reduced or outright eliminated. The same may not be said of Virginia’s new prosecutors.

“To reduce the volume of convictions, Biberaj said she favors new pretrial diversion programs for people charged with lower-level charges (including marijuana possession, theft of under $500, disorderly conduct) to ‘earn’ a dismissal of their case,” The Appeal reported after an interview with the then-candidate last month.

Descano proposed something similar last spring.

“I would create a presumption that any theft under $1,500 is treated as a misdemeanor,” he said at the time.

Similar laws that have been implemented in California have led to a “rise in shoplifting, thefts, criminal activity” across the state, according to a recent Fox News report.

“[B]razen acts of petty theft and shoplifting are a dangerous and all-too-common consequence of Proposition 47, a referendum passed five years ago that critics say effectively gives shoplifters and addicts the green light to commit crimes as long as the merchandise they steal or the drugs they take are less than $950 in value,” the report reads.

“The decision to downgrade theft of property valued below the arbitrary figure from felony to misdemeanor, together with selective enforcement that focuses on more ‘serious’ crimes, has resulted in thieves knowing they can brazenly shoplift and merchants knowing the police will not respond to their complaints, say critics.”

And apparently, Soros would like to see the same thing happen all across the country …

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