Comedians held hostage: ‘Woke’ crowd ruining comedy

“Saturday Night Live” legends have their former employer in their crosshairs due to the recent firing of comedian Shane Gillis over past comments that were deemed racist.

Problem is, comedians find themselves under a microscope — unable to tie any group, race or even “similar-thinking people” to any humor or even mention.

Gillis lost his “SNL” gig after a YouTube video of him using a racial slur while discussing Chinatown went viral.

(Screenshots from Fox News, Hollywood Reporter, Comedy Central YouTube)

“Why do the f***ing c***ks live there?” Gillis asked at one point.

Talking about Chinese restaurants, he also complained about the language barrier that often exists between waiter and patron. He said the restaurants are full of “f***ing Chinese … and the translation between you and the waiter is just such a f***ing hassle.” Gillis apologized for his statements and said they were little more than bad jokes made by a comedian.

Joe Piscopo, who worked on “SNL” in the ’80s, had a particular problem with the increasingly-political sketch show taking the high road. While he’s not a fan of Gillis’ specific joke, the 68-year-old comedian told Fox News that “SNL” is responsible for plenty of sketches that would never make it to air in today’s politically correct climate.

“You watch old clips and they bleep us out,” Piscopo said. One skit he mentioned that would be particularly problematic in today’s climate would be Eddie Murphy’s “Mister Robinson’s Neighborhood.”

“It’s really out of control,” Piscopo added about PC-culture, saying it’s reached the point where the First Amendment is under attack.

Comedians Bill Burr and Jim Jeffries both took shots at “SNL” during a recent appearance on David Spade’s “Lights Out.”

“This is just cancel culture, the guy shouldn’t have been fired,” Jefferies said. “Are we going to get rid of every sketch that ‘SNL’ has done that involves race? I remember John Belushi dressing as an Asian man with a samurai sword. That was the whole sketch.”

“Do they go back and also try to look at good things the person might have done or do they just look for the bad stuff?” Burr asked.

“We’re not running for office, when is this going to f***ing end?” Burr later said of woke mobs attacking comedians.

“F***ing millennials, you’re a bunch of rats. All of you!” he added.

Gillis also received support from former “SNL” cast member Norm MacDonald.

“Hey, Shane, I’m so sorry. I can’t even imagine how you must feel. The work it takes to get that show and to have it snatched away by some guy who does “Spoken Bird” poetry. Unacceptable. Please DM me, pal, when you have a moment. I’m so sorry,” the comedian tweeted to Gillis.

This distaste for PC-culture is only growing among artists, especially comedians.

“If you do anything wrong in your life… and I find out about it, I’m gonna try to take everything away from you, and I don’t care when I find out. Could be today, tomorrow, 15, 20 years from now. If I find out, you’re f–king finished,” comedian Dave Chappelle said while impersonating a triggered person during his “Sticks & Stones” comedy special, which critics hated, but audiences loved.

Podcaster Adam Carolla, who helped produce the upcoming “No Safe Spaces,” has also railed against social justice warriors.

During the Comedy Central roast of Alec Baldwin, Carolla said Baldwin had a good sense of humor “unlike the social justice warriors that are going to be out there tweeting that all the jokes are problematic.”

He then added for good measure, “You people can blow me, you p***y f***k sticks.”

Rob Schneider, another “SNL” alum, also tweeted his support for Gillis.

“@ShaneMGillis as a former SNL cast member I am sorry that you had the misfortune of being a cast member during this era of culture unforgiveness where comedic misfires are subject to the intolerable inquisition of those who never risked bombing on stage themselves,” the comedian tweeted.

Gillis himself tweeted about the whole controversy and said it’s impossible not to find offensive material if you go through years of a comedian’s work:

Piscopo said he has hope for the future because he believes that the end of PC-culture is near and pointed to controversial comedian Eddie Murphy’s promised return to the stage as the first sign that comedians are winning the culture war.

“If you think Chappelle went in, wait until you hear Eddie Murphy,” he said.

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