Mulvaney discovered a ‘wonderful way’ to drain the swamp and get federal workers to start quitting

Mick Mulvaney, President Donald Trump’s acting chief of staff and the current budget chief, says he has found a way to “drain the swamp” in Washington D.C.

Speaking in South Carolina on Friday night, Mulvaney said a great way to shrink the federal government would be to propose moving government agencies outside of the “liberal haven” that is Washington D.C. Once you do that, Mulvaney argues, federal workers will start quitting.

(Screenshot from YouTube)

“What a wonderful way to sort of streamline government and do what we haven’t been able to do for a long time,” he said.

Mulvaney was addressing the state Republican Party’s Silver Elephant gala when he made his comments.

Touting the economic successes of the Trump administration, Mulvaney promised that the president is hard at work keeping true to his 2016 promise to “drain the swamp.”

“It’s really, really hard to drain the swamp, but we’re working at it,” he said.

In his speech Mulvaney detailed how difficult it really is to “drain the swamp” that is Washington D.C.

When he was the temporary chief of the huge Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, he said he tried to move it to Cleveland, but legislation pushed by Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) made it impossible for him to do that.

“It was against the law for me to move” it, he said. “That’s how hard liberals work in making sure government lives forever. And the government consistently gets bigger, and you can’t make it any smaller.”

There have been instances, however, where the moving of agencies has worked out. Mulvaney pointed out that the administration managed to move two Department of Agriculture research agencies to Kansas City and the result of the moves was that many people quit.

“Guess what happened? More than half the people quit,” Mulvaney said of the move. Now, it’s nearly impossible to fire a federal worker. I know that because a lot of them work for me, and I’ve tried. You can’t do it.”

Fear of being outside of the “bubble” of Washington D.C. scared people into leaving, Mulvaney argued.

“By simply saying to people, ‘You know what, we’re going to take you outside the bubble, outside the Beltway, outside this liberal haven of Washington, D.C., and move you out to the real part of the country, and they quit,” he said.

He did admit though that even those two moves were “difficult to do.”

Mulvaney also defended Trump’s recent comments about Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) while speaking in South Carolina. He argued that the “Trump is racist” arguments from the left are due to a double standard.

“Here’s what I know. If a Republican criticizes somebody because of their ideas, people immediately start looking into whether or not we’re doing it because of who they are or where they’re from and what color they are,” Mulvaney said. “If a Democrat criticizes that same person, they get treated differently.”

Another example of a double standard, Mulvaney argued, was the way the mainstream media has responded to the president criticizing the congressional “squad” — AOC, Rashida Tlaib, etc. — versus how they respond to Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) criticizing the young lawmakers.

“Nancy Pelosi criticized the same people, and the media … and the folks on the left immediately came to Nancy’s defense,” he said. “They said it’s not possible for her to be a racist. Why? Because she’s a Democrat, and was clearly only attacking them on their ideas. If you don’t see a double-standard there, you’re not paying attention.”

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