‘Wise up kiddo’: US Army combat vet cuts David Hogg down to size when he accuses military of ‘imperialism’

(File Photo: screenshot)

College freshman David Hogg apparently still has some gaps in his education.

A snarky comment about “US military imperialism” earned the anti-gun activist survivor of last year’s high school shooting in Parkland, Fla., a brutal schooling from a Purple Heart recipient and a response from the U.S. military.

“Alexa, what does US military imperialism look like?” the 19-year-old tweeted Tuesday, linking to a Yahoo News article.

Hogg made his remark in reference to the piece which analyzed U.S. military operations in Africa, many of which occurred between 2012 and 2016. But he would have done better asking Alexa to elaborate on who was commander-in-chief during those important years that the “military imperialism” took place.

The article presented a “list of 36 operations and activities that are (or were until recently) ongoing in Africa” and almost all of which “are unknown to the general public.”

Notably missed by Hogg is the fact that the majority of the operations began during the Obama administration.

According to the Yahoo News article:

Between 2013 and 2017, U.S. special operations forces saw combat in at least 13 African countries, according to retired Army Brig. Gen. Don Bolduc, who served at U.S. Africa Command from 2013 to 2015 and then headed Special Operations Command Africa until 2017. Those countries, according to Bolduc, are Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Somalia, South Sudan and Tunisia. He added that U.S. troops have been killed or wounded in action in at least six of them: Kenya, Libya, Niger, Somalia, South Sudan and Tunisia.

 

Hogg not only revealed his ignorance, he was given a swift and scathing rebuttal by decorated U.S. Army combat veteran and New York Times Bestselling author, Sean Parnell, who offered the simple advice, “Wise up kiddo.”

Parnell slammed Hogg’s “nonsensical talking points” as harmful to those who serve and those who have lost loved ones in service.

Others also blasted the former Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student.

Naturally, Hogg had his fan base on the left rise to his defense, as MSNBC analyst and Time Mag contributor Elise Jordan fired a shot at Parnell, a former U.S. Army airborne ranger who served in the legendary 10th Mountain Division.

But the American Warrior Initiative co-founder, who received two Bronze Stars and the Purple Heart, was having none of it.

U.S. Africa Command responded as well, reiterating what the article – which Hogg apparently didn’t bother to read – said about the mostly peacekeeping operations.

“What’s most important to know is that our command is dedicated to assisting partner nations in their efforts to bring stability and security to their people. We view our mission through a whole-of-government lens, and strive to enable capable, responsive African governments that serve the interests of their citizenry,” Major Karl Wiest, a spokesperson for U.S. AFRICOM, told the Washington Examiner.

“U.S. Africa Command, with our partners, strengthens security forces, counters transnational threats, and conducts crisis response in order to advance U.S. national interests and promote regional security, stability, and prosperity,” he said. “Ultimately, the core mission of U.S. Africa Command remains one of helping our partners to strengthen defense capabilities. We concentrate our efforts on helping African nations and regional organizations build capable and professional militaries that respect human rights, adhere to the rule of law, and more effectively contribute to stability in Africa.”

Hogg’s clueless and snarky comment, as well as the liberals defending him, sparked plenty of criticism on Twitter.

Frieda Powers

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