Bring on the biscuits & chocolate milk: Trump makes school meals great again, relaxes Michelle O’s restrictions

While the slobbering media was in former first lady Michelle Obama’s corner in her campaign to make school lunches healthier, images of entire lunches being thrown away ring fresh in our minds.

The end result may have appeased liberal consciences, but it did little to pass muster with the palates of the children and the Trump administration is looking to make school lunches great again, according to the Daily Mail — though it may be  a stretch to suggest they were ever “great.”

“If kids are not eating what is being served, they are not benefiting, and food is being wasted,” Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue said in a statement.

After all, if we can put a man on the moon, surely we can serve 30 million school children a nutritious AND appetizing meal.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Low-fat chocolate milk is an item now allowed with a relaxing of the rules that Purdue suggested would “make school meals great again.”

“I wouldn’t be as big as I am today without chocolate milk,” he said at a 2017 press conference on the issue.

More from the Daily Mail:

Under the new rules introduced by the Trump administration, the U.S. school lunch program is making room on menus again for noodles, biscuits, tortillas and other foods made mostly of refined grains.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said Thursday only half the grains served will need to be whole grains, a change it said will do away with the current bureaucracy of requiring schools to obtain special waivers to serve select refined grains foods.

Low-fat chocolate milk will also be allowed again.

Previously, only fat-free milk could be flavored, although that rule had also been temporarily waived.

 

Mrs. Obama lashed out last year over the Trump administration’s plans to roll back some restrictions of what was her signature accomplishment, the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act, a bill that codified many of her changes to the national school lunch program.

“Think about why someone is OK with your kids eating crap!” she said. “This is where you really have to look at motives. You have to stop and think, why don’t you want our kids to have good food at school? What is wrong with you?! And why is that a partisan issue?”

In the Trump administration’s favor is a recent article suggesting that a federally funded school lunch program described as an “important component” of the former first lady’s efforts to combat childhood obesity was backed by shoddy science.

As for the media, we are reminded of President Trump’s fondness for fast food, as if this has a bearing on trying to improve on a program that was widely seen outside the liberal bubble as problematic.

Ken Cook, president of the Environmental Working Group, suggested as much to the New York Times.

“Just because children would rather eat heavily salted, processed foods at school doesn’t mean they should,” Cook said. “The president’s fondness for Big Macs and KFC is well known, but we shouldn’t let Colonel Sanders and McDonald’s run the school cafeteria.”

The American Heart Association also denounced the rollback, according to The Times, saying that more sodium and sugar would increase students’ blood pressure and put them at greater risk of heart disease and strokes.

Kids?

On the other hand, the newspaper reported that the national School Nutrition Association cheered the regulatory rollback.

“We have been wanting flexibility so that schools can serve meals that are both nutritious and palatable,” said the group’s chief executive, Patricia Montague.

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Tom Tillison

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