Kavanaugh accuser’s dubious past comes to light as 60 classmates claim they’ve never even heard of her

Five dozen former classmates of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh have signed a letter refuting the latest sexual assault allegations against him and calling them “reprehensible.”

“We never witnessed any behavior that even approaches what is described in this allegation. It is reprehensible,” they wrote in a letter submitted Wednesday to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

“In the extensive amount of time we collectively spent with Brett, we do not recall having ever met someone named Julie Swetnick. Nor did we ever observe Brett engaging in any conduct resembling that described in Ms. Swetnick’s declaration.”

A client of creepy porn lawyer Michael Avenatti, accuser Julie Swetnick claimed this week that during high school parties she had attended while she was in college in the 1980s, she observed Kavanaugh and his friend Mike Judge present at parties where “gang rapes” of young women occurred. Despite observing these alleged gang rapes, she continued attending the parties.

A number of questions immediately come to mind. Why would a college student attend high school parties with underage boys? Why has nobody else who witnessed these rapes spoken up? And why had Swetnick continued attending these parties knowing full well that rapes were occurring at them?

Even more concerning is Swetnick’s own history of questionable behavior. Within the past 10 years she’s had two tax liens filed against her — one for $100,000 that she eventually settled in 2015, and one for $62,000 that she settled in 2016.

In 2001 her former boyfriend, Richard Vinneccy, filed a restraining order against her after she reportedly threatened him and his family.

“Right after I broke up with her, she was threatening my family, threatening my wife and threatening to do harm to my baby at that time,” he said in a phone interview with Politico. “I know a lot about her. She’s not credible at all. Not at all.”

Swetnick also has a history of filing complaints against others. In 1993 she filed a criminal harassment complaint against a Maryland podiatrist and his wife. That complaint was withdrawn months later.

Two decades later, she filed a sexual harassment complaint against her former employer, York Life Insurance Co. The company eventually reached a financial settlement with her. What’s disconcerting is that the law firm she hired to represent her was owned by Debra Katz, the same attorney currently representing Kavanaugh’s other accuser, Christine Blasey Ford.

The reaction on Twitter to this stunning connection was one of shock and suspicion:

The belief by many, including President Donald Trump, is that all these spurious allegations are part of a “con game” being run by Democrats in a bid to prevent Kavanaugh from being confirmed to the high court. The growing evidence suggests they may be right.

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