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Controversial meme comparing Planned Parenthood to KKK gets removed

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The creator of a meme declaring that Planned Parenthood has killed more blacks than the Ku Klux Klan is defending his post which was deleted by Instagram.

Ryan Bomberger, co-founder of the pro-life Radiance Foundation, argued that the meme which compared the number of blacks lynched by the KKK to the number of black fetuses aborted by Planned Parenthood, did not threaten violence as Instagram contended.

(Image: Radiance Foundation)

“While writing this article, we were censored by Deities of Diversity. Apparently, Instagram deleted our post, threatening to restrict or disable our account if we violate their guidelines again. But … we didn’t violate any guidelines,” Bomberger wrote Friday.

“The explanation they included in the warning were about threatening violence. Of course the meme wasn’t threatening violence–it denounced racial violence, no matter the era,” he continued.  “But Titans of Tolerance have no interest in the truth. They can delete our posts, and even our account, but they can’t delete the truth. And of course, there was no due process, no appeal process, no one to reach to correct this injustice. There was no option other than to click OK and the purge was complete. #Liberalism.”

(Image: screengrab/Ryan Bomberger)

“Instead of exhibiting outrage over the shedding of innocent blood, protestors were outraged by relevant history being invoked (that’s regularly exploited by liberals who falsely compare today’s America with pre-Civil Rights America),” Bomberger wrote.

Brian Johnson, the worship pastor of California megachurch Bethel Redding, found himself in the middle of the controversy after he shared Bomberger’s meme on Instagram and was called out on Twitter by writer Ayana Lage, The Christian post reported. Though Johnson deleted the post, he eventually had to delete his entire account because of the backlash.

Johnson’s father, Bethel Redding’s senior pastor Bill Johnson, reposted the meme and explained how its creator was a black man, conceived in rape.

“The meme juxtaposes the vile, racist and elitist worldview of those in white coats who unapologetically set out to control the population with the same racism that drove the murderous acts of a bunch of cowards in white sheets,” Bomberger said in his defense of his meme.

“If people want to be offended by anything, be offended by a worldview that denies that we’re all created equal and justifies the slaughter of the weakest among us. Be offended that women are told by a billion-dollar abortion industry that they’re not stronger than their circumstances,” he added. “But don’t be offended because you simply don’t know what you don’t know.”

Bill Johnson added a longer statement, arguing that the important thing is the intent of the meme, regardless of whether everyone agrees on the method of delivery.

“I and everyone I know is rightfully outraged at the KKK; embarrassed that it is a part of American history. Anyone who reacts to me, or the meme because they think it’s an effort to lessen our disgust towards this disaster is rightfully angered,” he said. “Perhaps if the pain and the torture of abortions were broadcast on reality TV the public would find it as disgusting as the KKK. And that was and is the point.”

Bomberger criticized the Instagram decision noting that “thousands liked and loved the meme on social media.”

“Some were more offended by the image of a noose than the fact that those made in the image of God have been slaughtered by the millions,” he wrote. “Soooo…the meme is the problem, not the genocide.”

Frieda Powers

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