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Texas lawmaker files legislation to conduct forensic audit of 2020 election ballots in 13 major counties

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A Texas state Republican has filed a bill that would authorize a forensic audit of the state’s most populous 13 counties after some discrepancies have been reported as a result of a similar audit of ballots in Arizona and Georgia.

“Democrats said in 2016 there was fraud. They said Russia, Russia, Russia,” Rep. Steve Toth told KTRH on Monday.

“Here we are after 2020, we’re convinced and I’ve seen it, there has been fraud in this election. Now it’s time to make sure we put it all to bed,” he said.

“We need a forensic audit to uncover all the fraud,” Toth added in a statement posted on Twitter.

The lawmaker went on to note that before the current special session — which dozens of state Democrats have denied a quorum by fleeing to Washington, D.C., on chartered flights last week — he met with his constituents to discuss concerns relating to voter integrity and that his bill, The Texas Voter Confidence Act, is “a product” of those discussions.

“Texans want to know more about the claims of voter fraud and deserve to have confidence in their elections,” he said, adding that Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton’s office has prosecuted more than 500 cases of voter fraud and is investigating an additional 400 alleged incidents.

“Voters want to know that their legal vote counts and matters,” said Toth.

His legislation has the support of Montgomery County Judge Mark J. Keough. “I fully support passage of this bill and look forward to the results of the audit,” he said, according to Toth’s statement.

One of the issues Toth is concerned about is the hundreds of millions of dollars donated by Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg mostly to Democrat-aligned, pre-2020 election ballot initiatives, and election officials, which he called “Zuckerbucks.” He believes the money was used, in part, to help rig elections in certain battleground states.

“They would not receive these monies unless they did specific things, including 24-hour voting, mail-in ballots to everybody, as well as drive-thru voting,” Toth said, according to KTRH radio.

Last week, officials with Cyber Ninja, the firm conducting the forensic audit of Maricopa County, Arizona, ballots, reported that tens of thousands of ballots were allegedly sent out, though there is no record of it.

CEO Doug Logan told state Republican senators during a hearing that there were 74,243 mail-in ballots received “where there is no clear record of them being sent” to voters, local reports noted.

In addition, Logan said his audit team discovered 11,326 people who weren’t on voter rolls that were prepared the day after the election but who did appear on a Dec. 4 list as being not only being registered but also having voted, according to Tucson.com.

President Joe Biden reportedly won Arizona by roughly 11,000 votes.

Meanwhile, a study released Monday found that nationwide, polling regularly underestimated support for former President Donald Trump by anywhere from 3 and 4 percent.

Josh Clinton, a Vanderbilt University professor and American Association for Public Opinion Research task force member, told The Washington Post “there was a systematic error that was found in terms of the overstatement for Democratic support across the board.”

“It didn’t matter what type of poll you were doing, whether you’re interviewing by phone or internet or whatever,” Clinton told the paper, according to Newsmax. “And it didn’t matter what type of race, whether Trump was on the ballot or was not on the ballot.”

The study found that polling for Trump in 2020 was similar to polling for his candidacy in 2016 against then-Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, a race he won by a significant electoral vote margin.

Taskforce analysts looked at 2,858 polls, including 539 national presidential surveys and 1,572 state-level presidential polls. They found that the gap overstated support for Biden by about 3.9 percent in the national popular vote and about 4.3 percent in state polling, the Post noted.

“It’s possible that if President Trump is no longer on the ticket or if it’s a midterm election where we know that the electorate differs in the presidential election, that the issue will kind of self-resolve itself,” Clinton told the Post.

“But if the polls do well in 2022, then we don’t know if the issue is solved or whether it’s just a phenomenon that’s unique to presidential elections, with particular candidates who are making appeals about ‘Don’t trust the news, don’t trust the polls’ that kind of results in taking polls becoming a political act,” he added.

Jon Dougherty

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