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USA Today targets Promise Keepers, urges Dallas Cowboys to thwart them from normalizing ‘hate speech’

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USA Today is accusing Promise Keepers, an evangelical Christian men’s organization, of bringing together eighty-thousand men this summer for a rally to “mainstream hate speech” as they preach biblical principles.

That’s according to Mike Freeman who is a leftist writer at USA Today Sports. He opened up an opinion piece by stating: “I’m tired. Just really tired. Tired of ignorance. Tired of fear. Tired of how some use both as weapons, cloaking bigotry as patriotism or religious freedom.”

Freeman argued that by allowing the rally to take place at the AT&T Stadium, the Dallas Cowboys “are helping to mainstream hate speech.” He’s calling on them to stop it from taking place.

He was clearly incensed with recent remarks made by Promise Keepers CEO Ken Harrison on Steve Bannon’s show “Real America’s Voice.”

“One of the things they’re doing to make their agenda happen is destroying the identity of the American people, and if they can get Christians, especially Christian men, to sit down, be silent and be passive, then they can be effective,” Harrison had remarked. “It’s working. Christian men are not standing up for what’s right. I mean, you think about how quickly we went from homosexual marriage to men putting on dresses, being called women, and playing on women’s basketball teams. Where are the Christian men?”

Freeman insinuated that Harrison is referring to some combination of the “HollywoodLiberalEliteLeftistSocialistsCommunists” and that his commentary has no place in sports.

Freeman sent an email to Harrison to try and get him to admit to the error of his ways and renounce what he deems as “hate speech.” The Promise Keepers leader was having none of that and stood strong in his faith, explaining to the leftist that the lines of sexual identity are being intentionally blurred.

“Look, today’s culture is blurring the lines when it comes to sexual identity. Both Promise Keepers and I subscribe to a Biblical worldview when it comes to male and female, and that’s one of the religious freedoms we celebrate in our nation. Sometimes we agree with culture, and sometimes we don’t,” Harrison contended in an email interview with USA TODAY Sports.

“The irony of defining my words as hate speech is that is exactly the opposite of what we teach. All people everywhere are welcome to come to our rally to celebrate and be unified around the fact that God forgives the sins of all who believe in Jesus,” he added.

The explanation only further enraged Freeman, who called Harrison’s comments offensive and inaccurate. He also mocked the premise that Christianity was being attacked, and snarked: “Obviously, all people are not welcome.”

Freeman then got to the heart of the matter: “By allowing this conference to happen at one of football’s meccas, and by AT&T allowing it, they are helping to mainstream hate speech.”

“His hateful words continue a trend of right-wing leaders and lawmakers attacking the transgender community,” Freeman stated.

“There are a number of anti-trans bills popping up all across the country. This is just bigotry. There’s no other way to say it,” he added, claiming that bills allegedly trying to erase transgenders in the name of religion, and the fight to protect trans people, is one of ‘the great civil rights battles of our time.’”

“It’s not anti-Christian to point out bigotry,” noted Freeman, who went on to state that Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones could use his influence to stop the event.

He added: “The battle against this type of bigotry is fought, in part, on this level. Don’t allow men like Harrison to use mainstream symbols like football, and a legendary business, as vessels to circulate hatred.”

Then he invoked President Biden’s faith saying he’s “extremely religious, and his faith doesn’t stop him from seeing trans people as human beings.”

Freeman seemed to be unable to wrap his head around eighty-thousand evangelical Christian men gathering together at the stadium in Arlington, Texas on July 16-17 or that they would be opposed to the LGBTQ movement as well as transgender individuals, even though their right to their own beliefs is protected under the U.S. Constitution.

There will be eight keynote speakers at the rally:

  • Jonathan Evans, former NFL fullback and chaplain for the Dallas Cowboys and Dallas Mavericks. He is the son of Dallas pastor and author Tony Evans.
  • Les Parrott, author and marriage counselor, is a professor at Northwest University.
  • Sam Rodriguez, pastor of New Season Christian Worship Center in Sacramento, CA, and president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference.
  • Bernard, pastor of the Christian Cultural Center in Brooklyn, NY.
  • Nick Vujicic, founder of the nonprofit Life Without Limbs and author of the book Life Without Limits.
  • Carter Conlon, pastor of Times Square Church in New York.
  • Donald Burgs Jr., pastor of Alief Baptist Church in Katy, Texas, and president of the African American Fellowship of the Southern Baptist Convention of Texas.
  • Jerry Boykin, retired Army lieutenant general and former deputy undersecretary of defense for intelligence in the George W. Bush administration. He now serves as executive vice president of the Family Research Council.

(Video Credit: Promise Keepers)

Promise Keepers was founded in 1990 by former Colorado University football coach Bill McCartney. The organization reportedly promotes godly husbands, fathers, and leaders and they are steadfastly devoted to Christianity and the teachings of the Bible.

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