EU lawmaker says France rejected mail-in ballots, machine voting: ‘We don’t find it safe enough’

A French member of the European Union parliament has said his country long ago got rid of mail-in balloting and recently defeated an attempt by the government of Prime Minister Emmanuel Macron to introduce electronic balloting machines because they invite too much opportunity for vote fraud.

In an interview with One America News’ Jack Posobiec, Parliamentarian Jérôme Rivière said that France banned mail-in ballots decades ago, though the country does allow limited “proxy” voting under certain, tightly controlled conditions.

“Since 1975, mail-in ballots have been banned from France’s electoral process because it is too easy to cheat,” Rivière said.

“Banned completely,” Posobiec interjected, for clarification.

“You cannot do mail-in ballots,” Rivière continued, going on to explain the country’s limited vote-by-proxy method. 

“You can vote for someone if you have the specific papers and it is filled by that person and delivered to city hall,” he said. Proxies “come with one piece of the document, where you vote they have the other piece of the document, so it is a process that is very secure.”

Rivière said the limited proxy vote method is in place for citizens who can’t get out to vote or who may be traveling on election day.

“But mail-in ballot has been known in France to be a major way of cheating and not having a correct electoral process,” the EU lawmaker added.

He went on to speculate that “Macron must have discovered how useful it is for the globalist agenda” because last week his government introduced a late-night amendment in the country’s senate “trying to allow early voting” via electronic ballot machines.

“He discovered suddenly that because of COVID you could jingle your way around” the normal electoral processes, which, according to a Time magazine expose published earlier this month, is how political operatives in the U.S. justified altering voting procedures ahead of the November election that the Trump campaign and Republicans in battleground states claimed were unconstitutional.

“The senators found out, were very upset, and refused to pass this amendment,” said Rivière. “But you can see there is this tendency among the globalists to change the rule of law, to change the electoral process. And the only reason, seriously, is that it allows more leeway to do things with the electoral process — to cheat. I don’t see anything else.”

In 2005, a study led by former President Jimmy Carter, a Democrat, and former Secretary of State James Baker, a Republican, found that mass mail-in balloting was subject to fraud on an unsustainable level. In particular, the study warned that mail-in ballots were the “largest source of potential voter fraud,” and that allowing “candidates or party workers to pick up and deliver absentee ballots should be eliminated” — a practice known now as ballot harvesting — should be banned altogether.

The panel’s recommendations were not adopted en masse either by most states or by Congress.

“So many of the problems we’re now hearing about in the aftermath of the 2020 election could have been avoided had states heeded the advice of the Commission on Federal Election Reform,” Carter-Baker Commission member Kay C. James, now the president of The Heritage Foundation, said in the days following the controversial November election.

Again to clarify, Posobiec asked Rivière, “Is there machine voting in France?”

“No, same thing,” Rivière responded. “We don’t find it safe enough. It is extremely complicated to have a safe process at such a large scale. So what we believe in…France is the fact that you come in in order to vote, you show your ID…explain who you are…and then you vote.

“One man, one person, one vote — that’s what democracy is all about,” Rivière added, saying the American systems of voting “baffles people all over Europe.”

“If you want something to be democratic, you need to know who votes,” he added.

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Jon Dougherty

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