Controversial Proud Boys leader was reportedly a ‘prolific’ law enforcement informant, he denies the claim

Controversial Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio has been accused of being an informant for law enforcement and working undercover for them. Court records and transcripts from 2014 purportedly show that Tarrio worked undercover and was an informant after being convicted of fraud according to Reuters. Tarrio is steadfastly denying the claims.

Evidently, a prosecutor, an FBI agent, and Tarrio’s own attorney all verified the claims of his undercover work during a hearing in 2014. In that hearing, prosecutor Vanessa Singh Johannes claimed Tarrio’s work led to the prosecution of 13 people on federal charges and helped local authorities investigate a gambling ring. She also said that Tarrio “cooperated with local and federal law enforcement, to aid in the prosecution of those running other, separate criminal enterprises, ranging from running marijuana grow houses in Miami to operating pharmaceutical fraud schemes.”



Jeffrey Feiler was Tarrio’s attorney at the time. According to records, he reportedly said his client worked undercover in several investigations. One involved the sale of anabolic steroids, one had to do with “wholesale prescription narcotics” and a third dealt with human smuggling. He said his client was a “prolific” cooperator, Reuters reported. Feiler also stated that Tarrio helped expose three marijuana grow houses.

Reuters also noted that an FBI agent who was present at the hearing vouched for Tarrio’s work at the time. He said that Tarrio was a “key component” in local police investigations regarding marijuana, cocaine, and ecstasy.

Tarrio claims he does not remember any of this and flatly denies working undercover or cooperating in cases to convict others. “I don’t know any of this,” he told Reuters. “I don’t recall any of this.” Those statements seem vague at best.

But he did admit to a 30-month sentence for relabeling and selling stolen diabetes test kits in 2012. That sentence was reduced to 16 months in some sort of deal. Tarrio insists this was because he and his co-defendants helped investigators “clear up” questions about his own case. He adamantly claims he never helped investigate others.

The judge in Tarrio’s case contradicted him by saying he “provided substantial assistance in the investigation and prosecution of other persons involved in criminal conduct.”

All of this is surfacing after the Proud Boys came under fire for their alleged part in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot. At least five members of the group have now been arrested, including organizer Joseph Biggs.

Police arrested Tarrio when he arrived in D.C. two days before the Capitol Hill riot. The Proud Boys leader was charged with possessing two high-capacity rifle magazines. Tarrio was not at the riot because he was under a judge’s orders to stay out of D.C. after being charged for also removing a Black Lives Matter banner from the Metropolitan AME church and then burning it. His trial is in June.

Former prosecutor Johannes stated, “I knew that he was a fraudster – but had no reason to know that he was also a domestic terrorist.”

There is no evidence Tarrio has cooperated with authorities since 2014. The scoop by Reuters appears incendiary and it remains to be seen if the evidence will be made public.

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